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May 7, 2008 @ 10:13 AM
owensA

Post: 2346

Join Date: Jul 2006

Location: Live from 215

^^what kind of bike do you want (road, touring, mountain, fixed, etc). What will you use it for (i.e. for fitness, transport, etc.)? How much are you looking to spend? I'm sure we can all give you advice but either way you'll need to go to a bike store at some point for determining frame size, etc.
May 7, 2008 @ 10:49 AM

Inactive

Just a bike for recreation. WHich would be the best for that? An hour ride in the park in the mornings and evenings? Not really for transportation. I know i could go to a bike shop, its just sometimes they have a way of directing u towards the most expensive bike they have. Im trying to get a little prior knowledge before i hit the store.
May 7, 2008 @ 12:56 PM
owensA

Post: 2346

Join Date: Jul 2006

Location: Live from 215

I'd say go with a road bike, that's what I use. Fixed gears are a bit of a fad right now but they don't have too much practical advantages besides, arguable, aesthetics (they're one gear, you use your pedals to stop, i.e. no hand brakes unless you add a front one, and are just kind of generally clumsy and can be a bit dangerous to ride, particularly if you aren't already an avid rider). In a fixed gear bike the pedals are tied to the wheel in such a way that you can't coast, if you wanna go down a hill expect your legs to be spinning very fast. If you are just biking around town/park (i'm assuming it's a concrete or smooth path in the park so as to not need a mt bike) and not going up hills you could opt for a single speed (non-fixed but with a freewheel and regular breaks and such) but unless you bike in a flat area (the Netherlands? ) you prolly want gears.

I mountain bike as well and spent a bunch of dough on my mt bike but for my roadbike (which I use for commuting and exercise as well) I hit up craigslist and got a used Fuji (a great company) in great condition for $140 (granted it's 30 years old but it didn't have an ounce of rust on it). Just make sure you find out what size frame you need, you'll want to go to a bike shop to determine that though, then go and look online or elsewhere and find your bike. You can prolly find some sort of approximate conversion online for height/frame size but height isn't a perfect way to determine frame size b/c leg length matters, but for a simple, imperfect point of reference I'm 5'10 and my road frame is 58cm.

As a road biker and mt biker I'm partial to gears and modern braking systems, but this is a fixie thread after all so I'm sure someone can explain their appeal (I for one don't understand it, but to each his own). Plus as fixed gears seem to be the hipster thing to do right now, regular road bikes might be a bit cheaper if you're looking for a used bike.
May 8, 2008 @ 04:02 AM

Inactive

Thanks for the info. I went to a bike shop yesterday and checked some stuff out. Still not certain what I want to do as of right now but the price ranges do seem to vary greatly. Im gonna take all of that into consideration when I decide though. Thanks again.
May 20, 2008 @ 12:00 AM
HH

Post: 491

Join Date: May 2007

Location: long beach

Ok, so I've never owned a fixed gear before but I am an avid cyclist (basically my transportation). I have a birthday coming up and am looking for a nice fixie that would suit a quick-learning beginner. Really looking for a very nice basic set-up until i get into purchasing my own parts. What would you fixie heads suggest?
May 21, 2008 @ 12:07 AM
adrian

Post: 531

Join Date: Jan 2007

Location: vancouver, bc

I'd suggest looking at Craigslist as you can find some steals there if you're lucky.

But since you're probably just looking for a new fixed gear, then some suggestions would be:

Windsor The Hour, Mercier Kilo TT, Bianchi Pista, or an Iro.

Those are the most common "entry level complete" bikes, so you can't go wrong with buying one of those. Hope this helped!
May 21, 2008 @ 03:34 PM
HH

Post: 491

Join Date: May 2007

Location: long beach

Thanks man, I'll look into those. I also heard good things about the Bareknuckle.
June 5, 2008 @ 02:50 AM
DjBooduh209

Post: 637

Join Date: Apr 2006

Location: Stockton-San Francis...

New wheel. Hasnt collapsed on me yet. Bunny hopping, leg over the bar skids, exct. Pretty strong imo


June 12, 2008 @ 12:10 AM

Inactive

If you want to get some good deals in Asia, do contact Brian@HKFixed, he has some good deals going all the time. Here are my setups. Old pics tho... Obey now with Risers and Cinelli Drops back on the Colnago

June 12, 2008 @ 12:22 AM

Inactive

I'd say go with a road bike, that's what I use. Fixed gears are a bit of a fad right now but they don't have too much practical advantages besides, arguable, aesthetics (they're one gear, you use your pedals to stop, i.e. no hand brakes unless you add a front one, and are just kind of generally clumsy and can be a bit dangerous to ride, particularly if you aren't already an avid rider). In a fixed gear bike the pedals are tied to the wheel in such a way that you can't coast, if you wanna go down a hill expect your legs to be spinning very fast. If you are just biking around town/park (i'm assuming it's a concrete or smooth path in the park so as to not need a mt bike) and not going up hills you could opt for a single speed (non-fixed but with a freewheel and regular breaks and such) but unless you bike in a flat area (the Netherlands? ) you prolly want gears.

I mountain bike as well and spent a bunch of dough on my mt bike but for my roadbike (which I use for commuting and exercise as well) I hit up craigslist and got a used Fuji (a great company) in great condition for $140 (granted it's 30 years old but it didn't have an ounce of rust on it). Just make sure you find out what size frame you need, you'll want to go to a bike shop to determine that though, then go and look online or elsewhere and find your bike. You can prolly find some sort of approximate conversion online for height/frame size but height isn't a perfect way to determine frame size b/c leg length matters, but for a simple, imperfect point of reference I'm 5'10 and my road frame is 58cm.

As a road biker and mt biker I'm partial to gears and modern braking systems, but this is a fixie thread after all so I'm sure someone can explain their appeal (I for one don't understand it, but to each his own). Plus as fixed gears seem to be the hipster thing to do right now, regular road bikes might be a bit cheaper if you're looking for a used bike.


I used to think pretty much exactly the same as you (read the first page of this post), I live in Hong Kong and we have the worst traffic, hills, pollution and I used to think it would be impossible to get around without gears, but the truth is it's a lot easier on a fixed gear (I have compared it with BMX, MTB and a road bike) so until you have actually tried it, I don't think you should assume..
As for the appeal, to me it's kind of like skateboarding or snowboarding when you are carving down a hill, no brakes and side to side body movement/skidding trying to avoid traffic and pedestrians is a rush in itself, ability to do tricks which are evolving dramatically from other types of riders getting into this sport in the pass few years... Bottom line, you just got to try it! PS I think your 58 frame is a tad too big for you if you're 5'10
June 12, 2008 @ 10:26 AM
owensA

Post: 2346

Join Date: Jul 2006

Location: Live from 215

I've ridden my boy's fixed quite a few times and it's just not for me, there's an initial novelty to it but that wears off and it just feels clumsy. Plus I'm in a city with aggressive drivers and I bike real fast so proper braking is very necessary. Plus in the Philly heat you really need to have gears and be able to coast so you can cool down and not have your legs pumping all day, it's a 100 degrees here and it's not even Summer yet. Not to mention I'm an avid mountain biker and road biker (for sport/recreation/exercise 5+ days a week) so I use my bike for more than just commuting so it would be awkward if every time i wanted to commute I'd have to get out of road/mt biker geared riding mode and get into the fixed gear stroke. I hardly think fixed gear riding is a lot easier than road biking, there's absolutely no mechanical, objective reason for that (outside of velodrome use), yes there are less parts so it's a bit lighter but that doesn't make up for the no gears disadvantage. I pass fixed riders on the street all the time (esp. on hills, uphill, as you note as being difficult on a single speed in your first post, and downhill as well) and I think theres a reason for that. Fixed gears are based on old technology/made for indoor tracks, there's a reason gears exist and its to make cycling easier, less strenuous, safer, and less awkward. The only clear advantages I see in fixed gears is that they're light (granted you buy an aluminum or carbon frame) and for those that don't know their way around the mechanics of a bike, there are less parts to worry about maintaining/getting fixed. I tend to work on my bike so that's not an issue but I understand that lot of fixed gear riders are fairly new to biking and not so knowledgeable when it comes to bike mechanics so I'm sure that's a major selling point for a lot of those people, as it should be. Plus as fixed gears are so much about image I guess the less parts you have to worry about maintaining/buying the more you can spend on ricing out your bike with fancy paint jobs, matching colored parts n such. I'm sure some people just like the continuous pedal/pedal brake style of fixed gears but it's just not for me.

And 58 cm fits me perfect, as it should for someone 5'11/33.75". I worked at a bike shop for some time and although we always made people try frame sizes/determined their inseam (inseam is much more significant in sizing than height itself) to get a proper fit, we also asked people their height and 57/58 was common for men of about 5'9-6'. And I'm talking size of the frame not top tube (my top tube is like 56 or so I believe), which I'm guessing you might be referring to.
June 12, 2008 @ 10:03 PM

Inactive

OK I am not going to argue with a roadie, for you information I have been riding bikes for over 30 years, have been riding mostly MTBs and BMXs and build/maintain my own bikes, but to give you an idea on being fixed, You feel clumsy because you aren't used to it and am not comfortable without brakes, it's normal. Once you get used to pedaling non stop all day and skid to brake, you can go as fast as you wish without worrying! And you can still "coast" by relaxing your legs loose and let the pedals do the work, it's basically a different way of riding a bike. I agree that gears help you climb up difficult hills and "Fixed gears are based on old technology/made for indoor tracks, there's a reason gears exist and its to make cycling easier, less strenuous, safer, and less awkward...", however some people enjoying going as fast as they can (like you) but others may enjoy the thrill of the danger and excitement from riding a bike designed 20 years ago for the track on the road without brakes! It's a rush you won't understand.
June 15, 2008 @ 01:29 AM
camthraxFHK

Post: 2491

Join Date: Apr 2006

Location: Brooklyn

^^^ yeah it's that skateboarderish mentality for some people.
June 15, 2008 @ 01:34 AM
camthraxFHK

Post: 2491

Join Date: Apr 2006

Location: Brooklyn

Thanks for the info. I went to a bike shop yesterday and checked some stuff out. Still not certain what I want to do as of right now but the price ranges do seem to vary greatly. Im gonna take all of that into consideration when I decide though. Thanks again.


Find an old ten speed that fits you and then take it to a bike shop and ask them to convert it to a fixed gear. It'll cost you like 300 total and isn't at all pretentious (which is a huge issue for non-hardcore cyclists where I live).

EDIT: A little contribution. My homie crashed at my house all last week and he ditched his NJS frame here. An M-idea that he picked up off someone in Japan last year. He's been traveling, and ditched all of his worldly possessions in my room, so I now have a frame that is too small for me hanging around and reminding me that I'm too tall for track bikes.


sorry for the shitty point and shoot in my room at night pics.
June 15, 2008 @ 09:31 PM
Killypants

Post: 1289

Join Date: Jan 2008

Location: Portland OR to Hanov...

Any reason I shouldn't get Weinman 18s for a conversion? Or are velocity rims worth the extra money?


I was wondering the same thing, are Deep-Vs worth the extra $$$ over Weinmann DP18s?
June 15, 2008 @ 11:57 PM

Inactive

I believe Velocity Deep V's are hype, they are heavier then most wheels, but they are also stronger and comes in a range of different powder or anodized colors. I think the rims itself could well be some Taiwanese OEM products and they just do the finishing but I could be wrong... Where as Weinmann is a noted manufacturer of rims and (formerly) brakes as well.
June 16, 2008 @ 03:01 AM
DjBooduh209

Post: 637

Join Date: Apr 2006

Location: Stockton-San Francis...

That colnago is cool

Took some pics of mine and my brothers bike. My fuji, Oldest bros concept, and older bros cinelli










June 16, 2008 @ 04:37 AM

Inactive

Very sick pics!
nice one
June 16, 2008 @ 12:25 PM
owensA

Post: 2346

Join Date: Jul 2006

Location: Live from 215

I believe Velocity Deep V's are hype, they are heavier then most wheels, but they are also stronger and comes in a range of different powder or anodized colors. I think the rims itself could well be some Taiwanese OEM products and they just do the finishing but I could be wrong... Where as Weinmann is a noted manufacturer of rims and (formerly) brakes as well.


cosign, Weinmann makes a good product, never really much about Velocity... I'd look into Mavic and Bontrager as well, IMO they make the best rims out there. If you're looking into rims from an aesthetic point of view I dunno though, not sure if either do crazy colors n such but from a functional, performance oriented point of view Mavics n Bontragers are great.
June 17, 2008 @ 10:51 AM

Inactive

if you want the lightest and strongest rim available, and want to pay for quality rather then hype, get these
June 17, 2008 @ 07:46 PM
camthraxFHK

Post: 2491

Join Date: Apr 2006

Location: Brooklyn

^^^ lol.

And Killypants, don't you think its fucked up how some bike shops in portland charge out the ass for weinmann dp18s?
June 18, 2008 @ 04:08 PM
Killypants

Post: 1289

Join Date: Jan 2008

Location: Portland OR to Hanov...

Yeah it is. Especially since Rivercity and the Gallery have a monopoly on the market basically. I might just buy a set on eBay...but then there's always the risk of getting a bad/cracked wheel, a bent spoke...eh. Do you know what they're charging in PDX for DP18's right now?
June 19, 2008 @ 11:06 AM

Inactive

be a real hypebeast and get some reflective deep v's
June 19, 2008 @ 01:54 PM
camthraxFHK

Post: 2491

Join Date: Apr 2006

Location: Brooklyn

Veloce, around the corner from my house is charging $250... That's a crazy high end boutique store though. Everything in there is $3000 and made in Italy.
June 19, 2008 @ 06:54 PM
Killypants

Post: 1289

Join Date: Jan 2008

Location: Portland OR to Hanov...

Yeah that's rediculous. I've seen new, powdercoated DP18s w/ surly hubs for $125 on eBay. $250 is crazy
June 20, 2008 @ 01:39 AM
SBeezy_

Post: 24

Join Date: May 2008

im getting tired of cruising around on my skateboard. any good names to throw out there for recommendations on a fixie? I look on craigslist and see stuff, but none of em for those "below average" height people.. fuji has one, but if I can find one cheaper, then thats all it'll take to change my mind.
June 20, 2008 @ 04:38 AM
camthraxFHK

Post: 2491

Join Date: Apr 2006

Location: Brooklyn

^^^ lol I have the opposite problem. I finally found a 63 cm tonight.

Anyone have any homies with one of these? Good/bad? I heard it has shit components...
June 20, 2008 @ 09:25 AM
owensA

Post: 2346

Join Date: Jul 2006

Location: Live from 215

^^Well what model is it? All I know is that cannondale tends to make excellent bikes, they're one of the best American bike makers. And btw that photo has two sets of brakes so it's a single gear not a fixed.
June 20, 2008 @ 01:22 PM
Killypants

Post: 1289

Join Date: Jan 2008

Location: Portland OR to Hanov...

No mah dude, it has a flip-flop hub. I dunno if you're familiar, but you can flip the rear wheel over and change from free to fixed. So it can be ridden fixed or free. Haha Cam i have the same problem, I ride a 62cm and it's barely big enough. You should look at the Schwinn Madison...you can get one for around $400 (well, I don't know about in Portland...) and of all the completes it has arguably the best components.
June 20, 2008 @ 02:40 PM
camthraxFHK

Post: 2491

Join Date: Apr 2006

Location: Brooklyn

^^^ thanks for the tip, but the top tube is only 57cm long... I want a longer top tube. I'm 6'6 and I hate arching my back.

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