Laurids Gallée is a Designer Committed to Perfecting the Process

“My work completely builds on personal fascinations.”

Design
1,060 Hypes 0 Comments

For Laurids Gallée, a creative career was written in the stars. He hails from a family of artists, and – despite rebelling against their influences for the better part of his childhood – now puts his hand to designing objects that have a distinctly artistic edge.

In 2015, he left his native Austria for the Netherlands, taking up a place at the Design Academy Eindhoven. The school is known for pushing boundaries and encouraging its pupils to think about design and its context – steering the careers of some of the most impressive creators of the day, from Formafantasma to Maarten Baas. It seems it provided that for Gallée too, who made the decision to head into design came after a brief spell of studying anthropology. You could argue that the two are more closely linked than you’d believe at face value. Anthropology, after all, is the study of humans and their behaviors, while design creates the world in which humans live. Although for Gallée, it was a desire to work in a practical sense rather than having his “head in books” that inspired the change. After his degree, he honed his skills in many manufacturing techniques and crafts, before founding his own studio in 2017. Now, from Rotterdam, he creates works that explore the possibility of traditional techniques when combined with modern materials and manufacturing processes – but always with a sense of refinement, and never without concept.

His most recent works (pictured above) are collectively titled “Empyrean”, and arrive in the form of softly glowing lamps. “Empyrean was believed to be a celestial place in the highest of heavens, occupied by the element of fire,” he explains. “The warm glow of the ceiling light Empyrean suspended 01 pays homage to this antiquated concept.” On the occasion of the launch, we caught up with Gallée to find out about his journey to design, his plans for the future, and how he came to create the Empyrean pieces.

Can you tell me about the process of creating the Empyrean light?

I worked in resin production for about 4 years, making art and design pieces for many of the well-known contemporary designers working with the material. My interest in resin dates back to my student times at the Design Academy, but I always thought the designers that were busy with it only scratched the surface, of what these materials have to offer. Casting resins are incredibly versatile since you control everything; color, translucency, surface finish, the whole feel of an object can easily be dictated.

It’s the ultimate tool if you’re interested in shaping an object from the ground up, and don’t want to rely on the aesthetic properties of natural materials. For years I was going to the workshop to observe how the material behaves under different lighting conditions, and more especially how the shape interacts with the internal reflections.

What was your first memory of exploring creativity, and what path did you take to get to where you are now?

Almost everyone in my close family is an artist. From my grandfather to my parents, as well as my aunt and my uncle, they’re all artists. I was exposed to their creative practices from very early on. Even though I rejected creative practices for the better part of my childhood, this influence of my family is undoubtedly what eventually paved the way towards this direction. As with so many others, it just needed a little nudge to get me to go there.

For me, it was studying anthropology that made me realize ‘no way am I going to put my head in books for the rest of my life’. Then I had a look at what creative study I could do. Design just felt the most approachable at this point in my life, so I applied at the Design Academy, and when I arrived in Eindhoven I instantly felt like I was at the right place.

“Almost all of my work is a direct result of exploring different materials and making processes”

Was there a moment that you felt you found yourself as a designer, in terms of your aesthetic or process?

I’m not sure if I’ve fully found my own aesthetic yet and there is a good chance that I never will. What I think I’m really good at is being interested in the process itself. Almost all of my work is a direct result of exploring different materials and making processes.

You could say it’s a certain kind of game until it eventually becomes really interesting and then it turns into work for the brief period of producing a piece. And after that, the process repeats itself again. I would however put my work in two different categories; there is all material-based work, and then there are my drawings, some of them also made on the objects I make. As playful as they are, the drawings feel much more like hard work for me. I’m incredibly critical of them and often have to chew through dozens of attempts until I’m only marginally satisfied.

What things do you look to for inspiration, and what influences your work?

I don’t really look too much at what other designers are doing, I can find more inspiration by looking at the history of applied arts. This could be anything from typically Austrian-painted farmer’s furniture ‘Bemalte Bauernmöbel’ to Japanese woodblock printing, but I would say most of it is work that involves the figurative illustration of sorts. For my resin works I don’t look at existing work at all, I’m trying to let the material dictate the process.

What does it mean to be a designer in 2022? What do you want to do through your work, and what have you got your sights set on?

My work completely builds on personal fascination, but it’s definitely important to me to convey a sense of surprise or wonder through my work. I feel it’s important for my wooden works to remind someone of traditional craftsmanship, that it’s clearly visible what this work is built on, while still being undoubtedly placed in the contemporary. In the best case, it should act as a sort of bridge, a traditional/contemporary hybrid, embracing both, the future and the past.

The resin pieces can also have this effect, however in a very different way, where materiality light, and color become the defining element. In the near future I would like to make something like large-scale installations, maybe something that is more interactive. I really don’t see my practice being confined to only the world of furniture design. This just happened to be my gateway to making things up until now.

Read Full Article

What to Read Next

The Future Perfect to Debut 30 New Pieces at Design Miami
Design

The Future Perfect to Debut 30 New Pieces at Design Miami

From a sofa made from resin balloons to a ceramics collection based on the power of femininity.

Emma Scully Gallery Pays Homage to the Female Spirit in Design
Design

Emma Scully Gallery Pays Homage to the Female Spirit in Design

In an exhibition titled “Reflecting Women”.

Closer Look: Panerai Commits to a Sustainable Frontier With Industry-Leading Submersible Collection
Watches

Closer Look: Panerai Commits to a Sustainable Frontier With Industry-Leading Submersible Collection

Presented by Panerai
The Submersible QuarantaQuattro eSteel™️ collection introduces featherweight components derived from recycled materials.


H&M Home is Branching Out Into Collectible Design
Design

H&M Home is Branching Out Into Collectible Design

The brand’s Head of Design Evelina Kravaev Söderberg explains why now is the time for high street to go high-end.

Early Glimpse of Bad Bunny's adidas Campus Collaboration
Footwear

Early Glimpse of Bad Bunny's adidas Campus Collaboration

The off-white kicks first popped up in the Puerto Rican artist’s “El Apagón” video.

Rolls-Royce Unveils World’s First Aero Engine Running on Hydrogen
Automotive

Rolls-Royce Unveils World’s First Aero Engine Running on Hydrogen

Hydrogen works as a form of zero carbon aviation fuel.

KOHH's Label Dogs Joins Bad Boy for Capsule Collection
Fashion

KOHH's Label Dogs Joins Bad Boy for Capsule Collection

A drop exclusive to HBX.

Soho House Announces New Mexico City Location
Design

Soho House Announces New Mexico City Location

Opening in 2023, the new location marks the members-only club’s first expansion into Latin America.

Futura and Avant Arte Cast Pointman in Pristine Carrara Marble
Art

Futura and Avant Arte Cast Pointman in Pristine Carrara Marble

‘MARBLEANGELO’ is an edition of 30 and will release on December 19.


SoleFly's New Jordan Brand Apparel Collection Honors MJ's Love for Yacht Life and Fishing
Fashion

SoleFly's New Jordan Brand Apparel Collection Honors MJ's Love for Yacht Life and Fishing

The assemblage features outwear pieces with utility pockets, tees and cargo trousers.

COMME des GARÇONS and PORTER Link Up For Special Holiday Bag Collection
Fashion

COMME des GARÇONS and PORTER Link Up For Special Holiday Bag Collection

“Holidays with PORTER” consists of eight original bags, which will be available through special in-store pop-ups

Air Jordan 5 "Mars for Her" Is Styled With Fiery Midsole Spikes
Footwear

Air Jordan 5 "Mars for Her" Is Styled With Fiery Midsole Spikes

Donning a palette that’s similar to the Air Jordan 5 “Raging Bull.”

Suit Up for the Elements in Style With Columbia’s New Icons Collection
Fashion 

Suit Up for the Elements in Style With Columbia’s New Icons Collection

Presented by Columbia
From the urban streets to outdoor retreats.

Official Look at the adidas adiFOM Q "Core Black/Impact Orange"
Footwear

Official Look at the adidas adiFOM Q "Core Black/Impact Orange"

The controversial silhouette silhouette closes out the month of November with a bang.

More ▾
 
Subscribe to our Newsletter

Gain access to exclusive interviews with industry creatives, think pieces, trend forecasts, guides and more.

By subscribing, you agree to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.

Looks like you’re using an ad-blocker

We charge advertisers instead of our readers. Support us by whitelisting our site.

Whitelist Us

How to Whitelist Us

screenshot
  1. Click the AdBlock icon in the browser extension area in the upper right-hand corner.
  2. Under “Pause on this site” click “Always”.
  3. Refresh the page or click the button below to continue.
screenshot
  1. Click the AdBlock Plus icon in the browser extension area in the upper right-hand corner.
  2. Block ads on – This website” switch off the toggle to turn it from blue to gray.
  3. Refresh the page or click the button below to continue.
screenshot
  1. Click the AdBlocker Ultimate icon in the browser extension area in the upper right-hand corner.
  2. Switch off the toggle to turn it from “Enabled on this site” to “Disabled on this site”.
  3. Refresh the page or click the button below to continue.
screenshot
  1. Click the Ghostery icon in the browser extension area in the upper right-hand corner.
  2. Click on the “Ad-Blocking” button at the bottom. It will turn gray and the text above will go from “ON” to “OFF”.
  3. Refresh the page or click the button below to continue.
screenshot
  1. Click the UBlock Origin icon in the browser extension area in the upper right-hand corner.
  2. Click on the large blue power icon at the top.
  3. When it turns gray, click the refresh icon that has appeared next to it or click the button below to continue.
screenshot
  1. Click the icon of the ad-blocker extension installed on your browser.You’ll usually find this icon in the upper right-hand corner of your screen. You may have more than one ad-blocker installed.
  2. Follow the instructions for disabling the ad blocker on the site you’re viewing.You may have to select a menu option or click a button.
  3. Refresh the page or click the button below to continue.