(W)taps...Mastermind...Wats so good about these brands...???

if you like colorful, flashy, graphic heavy designs, wtaps, nbhd, mastermind, etc... are NOT the brands for you! the qualities that make these brands "good" tend to appeal to older and mature audiences with steeper pockets. do us a favor and stick to the brands you mentioned that you actual like. don't try and ask other people to help justify buying into a brand you think no one else knows about so you can be "cool"

2 Weeks ago in Fashion

How does Visvim fit?

yeah depends on the model, but it seems to run a half size smaller. im a size 9 and i wear 9.5 for shakers, 9 for ancestors, and 9.5 for twombly's

2 Weeks ago in Fashion

Post your unpopular opinions or thoughts

the u.s. government was behind the 9/11 "terrorist" attacks

2 Weeks ago in Off Topic

Streetwear as a subculture

[Quote] No you're right, it doesn't when you put that way. I guess I'm just trying to make something out of nothing, it is business after all.

2 Weeks ago in Brands

Streetwear as a subculture

[Quote] Yeah that makes a lot of sense. Well I guess I need to be more clear about what I say because I didn't mean anti-capitalistic literally, as in they intentional didn't do a second run because they were consciously being anti-capitalistic. I meant it more like symbolically if you were just looking at the big picture kinda thing, if that makes any sense. But thanks for bringing it up.

2 Weeks ago in Brands

Streetwear as a subculture

[Quote] Just wanted to clear up the anti-capitalist part real quick. An aspect of the capitalistic ideology is mass produce, sell to the masses, maximize profit. With the way independent "street wear" brands, their ideology when it comes to production is not quite the same, at least some of the brands I'm aware of. Just a guesstimate... hundreds of each item depending on how established they are? It could be argued that they don't have the necessary capital to produce more and would if they could, but I believe a lot of it has to do with not wanting to water down their brand / image for the sake of profit or "selling out." Even if they sell out of a certain item and they can reproduce more to "capitalize" on the profit, they keep their clothing special to those who already have it, which can create a closer bond with the brand and the consumer. Of course, this can lead to the whole exclusivity and resell aspect, but I won't address that. I think a perfect example would be the The Hundreds Paisley Hoodies. What they did, to me, is an anti-capitalistic move. Knowing it sold out, they could have scrounged up some cash and got more made Paisley hoodies made, but they didn't. I might be giving "independent brands" more credit then they might deserve because as rasclaaat pointed out, business is not always black and white, and not all independent businesses work this way. But for me personally, that is the type of business ideology I look for when it comes to brands I buy, and that's what I meant by anti-capitalistic motives. Not necessarily expressing anti capitalistic ideas in the clothing, but rather in the way the business is run.

2 Weeks ago in Brands

Streetwear as a subculture

Sorry, I guess I wasn't clear. I do agree that with any type of business, indie or corporate, the objective is to make money, plain and simple. But I don't believe a business should compromise its integrity or its values knowing it will make them extra money. Ideally, (I know it shouldn't using the word) you would want to make as much money as you can without having to compromise what you believe in. Of course, what you pointed out, realistically that doesn't always happen that way. I'm glad you point that out because I wasn't consciously aware of how idealistic I was being. I understand that as well because I am approaching that point of my life where I have to decide how I am going to make a living. I may not have first hand experience like you do, but I am completely aware of it. So what is it that you do?

2 Weeks ago in Brands

Streetwear as a subculture

[Quote] I'm glad that you find it interesting. I understand a lot of my idealistic views are in my argument. But what I'm interested in as a future sociologists is, do people who consciously buy "street wear" consider "street wear" a subculture, at least from the sociologically analysis I've presented. Why or why not? Like I said, I am very open to ideas and opinions because this is something that really interests me and something I would like to pursue in the future.

2 Weeks ago in Brands

Streetwear as a subculture

I agree, I am idealist and I really don't real have bills to pay. And I honesty don't know what "real" life is like because I do live comfortably. I do make my own money to support my interests. But at the same time, ideally I don't feel you have to sell yourself short just to earn a buck, regardless of the harsh realities of life. I'd rather making a decent living doing something I love rather than selling out my soul to be rich. At some point, I know I will probably have to sell out and do something I really don't want with my life just to earn a living, but that is besides the point. You are right, I am graduating senior. I do have a lot to learn which is why I even bothered laying out all my ideas and opinions. My intention was to prove SOCIOLOGICALLY that "street culture" is a subculture, whether or not you agree with it. I don't mind being proven wrong although you haven't really presented me things I wasn't already aware of. Like I said before, I do understand where you are coming from and I've agreed to some of the things you said to some extent. There is a conflict between doing something for love because most of the time it isn't realistic in our country. You are under the assumption all everyone cares about is money, and in "real" life, you have to do whatever it takes to make a living or to survive. Lot of it has to do with politics but I'm sure you know whats up. It makes sense why you would say everything is business. As for Binary Star, they may be broke but at least they are respectable. And they were never "technically" a group, but two emcees collaborating, as one of them put it. We all perceive things differently and I respect that, so I am curious to know what "street wear" brands YOU like to go shopping for.

2 Weeks ago in Brands

Streetwear as a subculture

[Quote] Well before I write whole another essay, let me just clear this up. You have corporations vs. independent businesses. I said I don't believe CORPORATIONS and ART should go together, which I already stated why. One of the element of "street wear" I believe is controversy, something that you will rarely see in the mainstream, corporate clothing labels. Because when something is too controversial, it is HARDER to sell, which goes against CAPITALISTIC ideal of producing for the masses to consume. Number Nine, Undercover, Neighborhood, Wtaps, Mastermind, even Supreme... have that element which is why I like and respect those brands. Even though I don't really like the Hundreds that much, I like some of the messages they put out as well which in my eyes a legitimate street wear brand. I said there is NOTHING WRONG with making a living with art, music or clothing as long as it's only about money. Independent businesses don't have to worry about censoring their stuff, they don't have to compromise true expression for money. [U]For love or money[/U], that is what it boils down to. That is one of the aspects that differentiates a true street wear brand from a watered down mass produced label. Creating art through passion and not creating art through the passion of making money. Although its about hip hop music, it applies to everything else I've been talkin' about as well... [B]"I ain't got nothing against no one tryin' to make a decent livin', it ain't the money that's the issue, only if that's the ONLY reason why these cats are makin' decent music, that's when I got beef with you." - Binary Star[/B]

2 Weeks ago in Brands

Streetwear as a subculture

All good, I was actually waiting for someone to bring that up. I don't want to go too in-dept with it because involves more of my personal life and my views on politics. But as brief as I can, I am consuming into materialism that I've grown up to since I was a kid. But when it comes to anything artistic, I don't, or really try not to, support corporations. Of course, there's no way I can completely avoid not supporting corporations because they've become such an integrated part of American culture. They've taken over basically every aspect of our country and there's not much we can do about it. My basic belief is that corporations and art do not mix and should be involved in anyway. Art is not meant to be mass produced and sold for everyone to consume. When I mean art, I mean anything artistic that humans use to express emotions, ideas, messages, specifically clothing and music. Because with the way corporations work these days, everything is filtered and gets watered down. There is not room for dissent in the mainstream. Corporations are all about profit, and I don't believe money should glamorized as much as it is in popular culture. In a sense, this is my form of retaliation towards the hegemonic culture. I'm using consumerism and materialism that I've been socialized into against them. All of the money I spend on clothes and music do not go towards corporations. Like I mentioned earlier, I use to be very ignorant because you're taught at young age that everything American is all great. But when you learn the truth and the corruption, you feel betrayed because it's all about money, doing whatever it takes to make money. That is what disgusts me the most. The more I think about it, the more odd and far-fetched it sounds. Maybe I'm just using it justify my consumption habits? But it is what I believe and I don't expect many people to see it the same way, which makes my own thing. But even without person opinions and ideas, I still say "street wear" is subculture from sociological point of view. I think said enough to demonstrate that so I'm not going to say anything more about it being a subculture or not.

2 Weeks ago in Brands

Streetwear as a subculture

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2 Weeks ago in Brands

Streetwear as a subculture

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2 Weeks ago in Brands

Streetwear as a subculture

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2 Weeks ago in Brands

Streetwear as a subculture

All good, I do disagree but at least I know where you're coming from. The definition as I see street wear is just clothing, style, fashion influenced by various street cultures, which I think I mentioned a few times before. Just so you know, I'm trying to make my argument from a sociological perspective with hints of my opinions and my ideas. If it doesn't seem that way, I apologize but it's not like I made up a lot of concepts and theories on my own, they are based on sociology. I don't deny that "street wear" is a business, but it is possible to make a living for what you are passionate about and not just for the money. Just like the people who consume "street wear" for the right reasons, the people who make it have to do it for the right reasons for things to work. Of course this leads to the question, how do we know? That is hard question and there's no way to know for sure except maybe ask the people who design the clothes, but even thats not for sure. The way I do is learn about what each clothing brand is about and see if that reflects in their clothing. Who knows, maybe every making street wear is just cashing in, which seems like the point you're trying to get across. Some can argue that even selling "street wear" considered selling out no matter how much of it you sell it or what level you are selling it at. But I think there is a acceptable level, which leads to whole another discussion. Discussing individual street wear brands is a good idea, maybe you should start by listing the brands you buy because I think said a lot already.

2 Weeks ago in Brands
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