hype cog

Supreme NYC store??

how much are the quilted leather caps....thinkin of gettin one

2 Weeks ago in Supreme

Supreme Fall/Winter 06

I'm from NY but i'm away from home for school in FL...Can someone hook me up with a Supreme Side New Era.....size 7 7/8 or 8...pm me back thanks a lot guys!!!

2 Weeks ago in Supreme

New Mama Men's C.R.E.A.M. & Diamond Argyle

trying to cop one for wifey and I....wish me luck

2 Weeks ago in Brands

Lemar and Dauley

also if any1 cann hook me up with a sz L of the Iverson, Biggie, Jordan and/or ghostface tee let me know!!

2 Weeks ago in Brands

Lemar and Dauley

yo i'm from LI...i'm off from work tomorrow and thursday...what stores in NYC can I cop?..let me know thx

2 Weeks ago in Brands

WHO'S WAITING UP FOR THE HUNDREDS TO DROP?

bout to head to class so unfortunately i'm going to miss out.....if sum1 can cop the light blue and royal blue in a L i'll hit u off w/ extra cash on top of cost and shipping...hit me up, thx and good luck guys

2 Weeks ago in Brands

New Hundreds?

[Quote] i would if i could but i'll be working..i only go online late at night wen i get off work...then i have class in the am =-/

2 Weeks ago in Brands

New Hundreds?

if some1 can get the light blue and royal blue in L hit me up

2 Weeks ago in Brands

GOV'T IS TAKING AWAY INTERNET FREEDOM!!!!!

If any of you guys have been aware, there is a bill that congress just might pass that takes away our freedom to browse the net. Here are some articles and a youtube video that greatly sums it up. So guys contact your local congress representatives, senators and etc.... We can't let this happen! this was taken from allhiphop.com [URL] House Rejects Net Neutrality The First Amendment of the Internet the governing principle of net neutrality, which prevents telecommunications corporations from rigging the web so it is easier to visit sites that pay for preferential treatment took a blow from the House of Representatives Thursday. Bowing to an intense lobbying campaign that spent tens of millions of dollars and held out the promise of hefty campaign contributions for those members who did the bidding of interested firms the House voted 321 to 101 for the disingenuously-named Communications Opportunity, Promotion and Enhancement Act (COPE). That bill, which does not include meaningful network-neutrality protections creates an opening that powerful telephone and cable companies hope to exploit by expanding their reach while doing away with requirements that they maintain a level playing field for access to Internet sites. "Special interest advocates from telephone and cable companies have flooded the Congress with misinformation delivered by an army of lobbyists to undermine decades-long federal practice of prohibiting network owners from discriminating against competitors to shut out competition. Unless the Senate steps in, (Thursday's) vote marks the beginning of the end of the Internet as an engine of new competition, entrepreneurship and innovation." says Jeannine Kenney, a senior policy analyst for Consumers Union. In case there was any question that Kenney's assessment was accurate, the House voted 269-152 against an amendment, offered by Massachusetts Democrat Ed Markey, which would have codified net neutrality regulations into federal law. The Markey amendment would have prevented broadband providers from rigging their services to create two-tier access to the Internet with an "information superhighway" for sites that pay fees for preferential treatment and a dirt road for sites that cannot pay the toll. After explicitly rejecting the Markey amendment's language, which would have barred telephone and cable companies from taking steps "to block, impair, degrade, discriminate against, or interfere with the ability of any person to use a broadband connection to accessservices over the Internet," the House quickly took up the COPE legislation. The bill drew overwhelming support from Republican members of the House, with the GOP caucus voting 215-8 in favor of it. But Democrats also favored the proposal, albeit by a narrower vote of 106 to 92. The House's sole independent member, Vermont's Bernie Sanders, a champion of internet freedom who is seeking his state's open Senate seat this fall, voted against the measure. Joining Sanders in voting against the legislation were most members of the Congressional Progressive Caucus, including its co-chairs, California Representatives Barbara Lee and Lynn Woolsey, as well as genuine conservatives who have joined the fight to defend free speech and open discourse on the internet, including House Judiciary Committee chair James Sensenbrenner, R-Wisconsin, and Intelligence Committee chair Pete Hoekstra, R-Michigan. The left-meets-right voting in the House reflected the coalition that has formed to defend net neutrality, which includes such unlikely political bedfellows as the Christian Coalition of America, MoveOn.org, National Religious Broadcasters, the Service Employees International Union, the American Library Association, the American Association of Retired People, the American Civil Liberties Union and all of the nation's major consumer groups. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-California, opposed COPE, while House Speaker Dennis Hastert, R-Illinois, and Majority Leader John Boehner, R-Ohio, were enthusiastically supported it. Among the Democrats who followed the lead of Hastert and Boehner as opposed to that of Pelosi were House Democratic Whip Steny Hoyer and Maryland Representative Ben Cardin, who is running for that state's open Senate seat in a September Democratic-primary contest with former NAACP President Kweisi Mfume. Illinois Democrat Melissa Bean, who frequently splits with her party on issues of interest to corporate donors, voted with the Republican leadership, as did corporate-friendly "New Democrats" such as Alabama's Artur Davis, Washington's Adam Smith and Wisconsin's Ron Kind all co-chairs of the Democratic Leadership Council-tied House New Democrat Coalition. The fight over net neutrality now moves to the Senate, where Maine Republican Olympia Snowe and North Dakota Democrat Byron Dorgan have introduced legislation to codify the net neutrality principles of equal and unfettered access to Internet content into federal law. Mark Cooper, the director of research for the Consumers Federation of America, thinks net neutrality will find more friends in the Senate, at least in part because the "Save the Internet" coalition that has grown to include more than 700 groups, 5,000 bloggers and 800,000 individuals is rapidly expanding. "This coalition will continue to grow, millions of Americans will add their voices, and Congress will not escape the roar of public opinion until Congress passes enforceable net neutrality," says Cooper. Cooper's correct to be more hopeful about the Senate than the House. But the House vote points up the need to get Democrats united on this issue. There's little question that a united Democratic caucus could combine with principled Republicans in the Senate to defend net neutrality. But if so-called "New Democrats" in the Senate side with the telephone and cable lobbies, the information superhighway will become a toll road.

2 Weeks ago in Off Topic

UPDATE: ORISUE

Hey, I'm in no mans land right now for school (Tallahassee, FL)..what online shops will be carrying your gear? I need a couple tees and that biggie sweater!!

2 Weeks ago in Brands
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