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A Brief Overview of Every Official Supreme Store Around the World

Rep your local city.

News of a new Supreme shop is always exciting; obviously for the locals, but also for fans of the brand all over the world as we see it expand and grow to be something extraordinary. Surprisingly, if you didn’t know already, while the store’s origin begins in New York, the country that has the most official outposts is actually in Japan, with more than two-thirds of the total store amount around the world. Here in the U.S., Supreme can be found at both it’s New York home and with a brick-and-mortar in Los Angeles, while over in Europe, the newest addition in Paris will accompany the London shop that’s been open since 2011.

UPDATE: Previously, we incorrectly labeled the store’s opening date. Supreme Paris is in fact not opening until Mid-March. We apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused.

As we patiently await the opening of the newest Supreme store in Paris, we felt it would be a good opportunity to briefly “visit” each of the stores to which the 1994 skate-inspired brand has to offer its customers and guests. The stores rough dimensions, artwork, shelving and even neighboring atmosphere is discussed, which will hopefully entice you to visit to next time your family vacation draws you near. As an added bonus, a quick recap of the store’s exclusive grand opening box logo, if it had one, is also explored. What will the Paris shop look like? Will it have an exclusive box logo? Stay tuned, but enjoy this virtual tour of all Supreme stores until then.

Supreme New York

Year of opening: 1994

“Genesis” when it comes to the brand, the New York store is and has been at its current location since the beginning. An array of televisions can be seen from the outside (where skate video sessions were held for the crew and their friends) as shoppers walk down the busy four-lane street. Inside, the New York store may have the highest ceilings among all the Supreme shops, with the most eye-catching display belonging to the skate deck wall found on the far back of the store. Shelving on the left and right makes the store expansive but also allows for queuing within the shop and an overall airy atmosphere. Artwork adorns the upper left and right walls above the products for a bit of culture, while hardwood flooring feels sturdy but also harks back to the New York traditional boutique aesthetic. A great selection of shops neighbor the NY flagship, with Brooklyn Industries, La Colombe Coffee, G-Star RAW, Carhartt W.I.P., and Diamond Supply Co. all within easy reach.

274 Lafayette St.
New York, NY 10012

Supreme Los Angeles

Year of opening: 2004

Another store which found its footing and stayed firmly planted is Supreme’s Los Angeles outpost. Located on the trendy North Fairfax Ave., the store, like NY, features a deep rectangular shop with high ceilings and a television display outside. The Los Angelenos however are treated to perhaps the greatest “bonus” found in all of the Supreme stores — a full, double circle skate bowl that overlooks the front of the store. Friends and family are found skating at any given time, while shoppers could hear the rolling of skate wheels as they shop their favorite threads. A special box logo released alongside the grand opening of this store — a red logo on a white tee with “Supreme” loosely translated in Hebrew writing. To this day, the tee remains one of the hardest releases to find, even in used condition–let alone new.

439 N. Fairfax Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90036

Supreme London

Year of Opening: 2011

The first store for Supreme in the European market, London’s outpost gives its guests a “negative-space” store; the majority of the products are accessible by going downstairs, while the above portion is a gallery of sorts for all things skate. Two giant Mark Gonzales sculptures dominate your eyesight as you enter the establishment, with a white version prominently hanging above the staircase and a yellow standing version in the center of the shopping area. Neighborhood-wise, restaurants surround the vicinity of the shop, while retail stores can be found on Carnaby St. only a few minutes away. A Union Jack box logo tee (surprisingly in a long sleeve variation as well) released for the new store as a proud drop for all London locals.

2-3 Peter St.
London WIF 0AA

Supreme Daikanyama

Year of Opening: 1998

The first of the Japanese brick-and-mortars landed in the ultra-cool area of Daikanyama, Tokyo. The store is actually quite subdued and rather hard to find compared to its later shops, but that’s a testament to its timeless design from 1998 to present day. The retail space is fairly small in size, with no 3D artwork in the way but rather all the photography and artwork of Supreme’s history decorating the walls. Racks of outerwear and basic clothing are movable on pipe racks, while the accessories are situated in the far corners and in the counter to the side. No exclusive Daikanyama opening box logo dropped when the store opened, but the infamous Kate Moss x Originalfake x Supreme t-shirt released for the store’s 10-year anniversary in 2008.

1-6 Daikanyama-cho
Shibuya-Ku, Tokyo
150-0034

Supreme Osaka

Year of Opening: 1998

What’s better than being located on the edge of the emerging trendy zone? Being located inside the emerging trendy zone. While most visitors to “the city of comedy and food” visit Namba and Shinsaibashi shopping areas, Supreme and all the hottest brands can be found in the Minami-Horie sector of downtown western Osaka. As you enter the store, look up — a giant Mark Gonzales sculpture welcomes visitors between restricted balconies that are only accessible for when Supreme throws parties and events. A relatively small shop that opened in the same year as the Daikanyama store way back in Supreme’s history, all you need is within arms reach, while comfortable seating lines the middle aisle of the store. When you’re done with Supreme, hit up Head Porter across the street, BAPE down the block, and with SOPHNET. and NEIGHBORHOOD two blocks away. No exclusive box logo released for Osaka — not in 1998 or when the store relocated inside Tachibana “Orange” Street in 2012 — but rumors flew that the Nate Lowman Bullet Hole Box Logo tees, left over from Shibuya’s grand opening, were sold at Osaka’s relocation to hardcore VIPs only.

1-9-8 Minami-Horie
Nishi-ku, Osaka
550-0015

Supreme Fukuoka

Year of Opening: 1998

Perhaps the most nonchalant shop of them all, Fukuoka’s coastal city of friendly locals and delicious ramen isn’t neglected a Supreme store. To the contrary actually, as the shop is situated perfectly in the fashionable streets of Daimyo, closeby to everything like The Real McCoys, BAPE Store Nagoya, HOODS Nagoya and even the gigantic underground shopping center in Tenjin a mere five minutes away. Fukuoka’s Supreme store is tiny, however (located in the “basement” of a karaoke parlor), but enough for queues and instant sell-outs of the hottest drops. Fukuoka also has a huge reseller/used select shop community, so expect to see a ton of used Supreme gear — at reasonable and unreasonable prices — decorating the stores nearby, hoping to get people to come in and cop what they couldn’t just a few days or even hours ago. Unfortunately, not too many photographs exist of the Fukuoka branch, so be sure to try to take some the next time you’re around.

1-11-29 Daimyo
Chuo-ku, Fukuoka
810-0041

Supreme Harajuku

Year of Opening: 2006

Perhaps the fan favorite for tourists and locals alike, the Supreme store in the heart of Tokyo’s fashion district Harajuku is both large and convenient. Situated above the equally-busy NEIGHBORHOOD Harajuku flagship shop, the 2nd floor store expands out with racks and shelves along the far opposite wall, outerwear jackets and bottoms to your left in front of Ari Marcopoulos photography splattered behind, and an expansive view of the pedestrians to your right. Check out all the original campaign photos along the walls too, but unfortunately they’re not for sale. The first customers to grace the store were treated to a very rare box logo, made of faux snake-skin — extremely coveted to this day, especially in pink.

4-32-7-2F Jingumae
Shibuya-Ku, Tokyo
150-0001

Supreme Nagoya

Year of Opening: 2008

Nagoya is one of those little big cities; Japan’s “Los Angeles” that most tourists tend to overlook when visiting Japan. Well, if you’re into fashion it’s definitely not a city you’d want to skip, as Nagoya is as fashionable (especially when it comes to streetwear) as the rest of the metropolises. The Supreme shop, now located in the youthful, hustling and bustling area of Sakae, is found on a busy block down the street from heavy hitters such as Stussy Nagoya, F.I.L. and the retailer Doubledutch. As for the store, the new location is fairly straightforward inside, with clean lines along the rectangular store, photography-clad walls and a huge collage of TVs facing the outside for the massive queues expected on Saturday mornings. When the original store opened, a special edition gold foil box logo was released that also featured a rear neck ribbon commemorating the 08.09.20 opening date. The shirt naturally sold out in no time and is incredibly rare to find now, with resale prices ranging between $250 – $500 USD.

3-13-28 Sakae
Naka-ku, Nagoya
460-0008

Supreme Shibuya

Year of Opening: 2012

The third outpost of official Supreme stores in Tokyo is perhaps the most modern, both inside and out. Before you enter, enjoy the minimalistic exterior shaped with grey concrete steps and a facade that’s sculpted to almost resemble a quarter pipe. The store is also one of the only stores to feature artwork outside — look above to discover a Nate Lowman bullet hole piece adorning the exterior (which is also the design behind Shibuya’s exclusive grand opening box logo t-shirt). Once you’re inside and enter the slightly elevated floor, you’ll notice the gigantic Mark Gonzales “Schminx” sculpture centerpiece in bright blue, along with the expansive showroom-style retail space. All clothing is once again found along the walls with the counter behind you housing all the accessories you’re looking for. Once you’re back out, head down the block to hit up another NEIGHBORHOOD shop, Head Porter Atelier at the end of the street, and Tetsu Nishiyama’s G.I.P. shop just a stone’s throw away.

1-18-2 Jinnan
Shibuya-ku, Tokyo
150-0041

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