Good Fish-Eye Lens for Canon?

[Quote]Manual focus on a fisheye is not a big deal. If you set the aperture to something like f8 and the focus point to 3ft, hyperfocal starts at, like 1.5 ft, meaning that everything farther than 1.5 feet from the lens is in focus. You can use any of the DOF calculator apps to figure this kind of stuff out. I have the Rokinon 14mm fisheye and shoot sports like this all the time. My only problem with the lens is that it has a very weird kind of distortion called "mustache" distortion as opposed to circular or diagonal. This isn't super noticeable for organic subjects, but will become apparent if you have lots of horizontal lines that are expected to be straight. There are some lens profiles that can correct for it, but I don't know if you could correct video that way.

2 Weeks ago in Visual Arts

fish eye lens for Canon T3i Help

[Quote]Great lens - I'd recommend it if it's within your budget.

2 Weeks ago in Visual Arts

Need Advice On Buying a good first camera

It's easier to learn with digital because there's no cost in time or money to shoot as many photos as you want. The only way anyone gets good is by shooting a lot and learning from what they've shot. I'd never recommend film to anyone who is just starting out. As was mentioned, what kind of camera is "good" depends a lot on what type of photos you take. The average camera is not going to be GREAT at anything other than photos that are taken outside during the daytime. Indoor / low light performance or super high resolutions are things that you will pay extra for. It's probably best to start out with something that is cheap but has the ability to use full manual controls, so you can learn how things work before you plunk down all your cash on something. Consider used cameras or renting as well.

2 Weeks ago in Visual Arts

D3000 vs Sony nex f3

I guess I forgot to specify which lenses would be good for indoor / low light shooting. Look for lenses with an f stop of f2.8 or lower. f3.5 and above are not going to provide good results using natural light during indoor shoots.

2 Weeks ago in Visual Arts

D3000 vs Sony nex f3

Low light performance costs $$$. If you have lots of money to spend, no problem. If you're on a budget, you might look at other options. The NEX cameras are great, but the lenses suck. Way too slow, especially for low light situations. That goes for all the Sony cameras - from NEX to A99.  If you need a full DSLR system, the newer models might meet your needs. If you want to stick to 4/3, look at the Olympus OMD E-5 or the Fuji X100s. Both are good values for the money. You can always search by camera type on Flickr and see if you can find some high ISO/ low light photos from the cameras you're considering and see how they stack up. dpreview.com is also an excellent resource for researching cameras before you buy. Depending on where you live, you might also consider renting the camera before you buy. I'm lucky enough to live near a "borrowlenses.com" location where I regularly rent gear that I'm thinking about buying. Good luck.

2 Weeks ago in Visual Arts

What's in your camera bag?

I've got a lot of pro level Canon gear, but if I had it to do over today, I'd be looking at stuff like the Olympus OMD E-5. Trying to figure out the least amount of gear that gives you the most creative options with an eye towards cameras that have a large population of fast lenses to choose from. My kit is 5D Mk3/5D Mk2 with Canon L series 50 f1.2, 24-70 f2.8, 70-200 f2.8, as well as a mixed bag of hot lights and flashes to help cover still or video. Jam all of the camera gear into the large size Incase DSLR pro backpack and that's what I carry on shoots.For casual things where I'm not primarily there to shoot, I carry my 5D Mk3 with the Canon 50mm f1.2 L, set to Tv/160 and auto ISO and medium sized (12MP) RAW in a case like the Case Logic DSLR holster. Keeps it low-profile. I can wear it with the strap inside my jacket so most people don't even notice I have a camera. If I didn't have so much invested in this system, I'd be considering the Fuji X100s or the aforementioned OMD E-5.

2 Weeks ago in Visual Arts

Super 8 Editing

The current arguments for/against editing real film vs digital revolve around the process. Digital editing gives you unlimited abilities to make different versions and never ending changes, while film forces you to have a singular point of view and makes you carefully consider every decision. in the old school camp,  Stephen Spielberg still edits his movies using Moviola stand-up film editors. Walter Murch is an Oscar winning film editor who has moved from analog to editing on Final Cut Pro. He has a great book called "In the Blink of an Eye". Worth checking out.

2 Weeks ago in Visual Arts

Saving image quality?

The thing with JPEG is that you are stuck with the image as you shot it. RAW opens up a lot of post processing options to correct for things like over/under exposure, etc. If you're confident that you're getting correct exposure and happy with the colors your camera gives you, by all means, shoot JPEGs. If you want to be able to tweak your photos more for either technical or aesthetic purposes, you're much better off shooting RAW and editing/adjusting in something like Lightroom or Aperture. Photoshop is only necessary for really major surgery.

2 Weeks ago in Visual Arts

Sony A230

With Sony, the hard part is the lenses. They're the only ones making lenses for their A series cameras, and they tend to make pretty slow lenses (meaning f stops - more than 2.8 is not suitable for indoor use without serious flash power). The camera itself seems plenty good for photos - 10MP is fine for nearly any print size. At 2.5fps, you're not going to be shooting skateboard trick sequences, but you'll be fine for single frames. You should probably try to get prime (that means non-zooom) lenses, like the Sony 50mm f1.8. That will give you good low light performance and a shallow depth of field if you decide you want it. Be aware that lenses whose lowest f stops are above 2.8 are going to be useful only in outdoor, daylight situations or with major flash or studio strobe lights - not available light indoor shooting.

2 Weeks ago in Visual Arts

Favorite Lens in Bag

It's an editorial decision - depends on what you're shooting and what feel you're going for. Kubrick used wide angle lenses to show the isolation of a character within the world. Barry Sonnefeld said he used wide angle lenses because he was a jewish kid who always wanted to be the center of attention and the wide angle lenses kept him close to the actors. As a sports photographer, I use my Canon 70-200mm f2.8L lens the most, but I'd probably say the Canon 24-70 f2.8 II is my favorite, because of the sharpness and the wider angle, but the reality is that wide shots aren't the best shots for the things I shoot.

2 Weeks ago in Visual Arts

What Kind Of Camera Should I Buy?

Micro 4/3 cameras, paired with something like the Rokinon 8mm lens should be a good start. As Serge mentions, if you want to move into serious photographer territory, you're going to need at least two flashes that can be fired remotely - you'll need them to either be super high power, or capable of high speed shutter sync. You want to shoot skateboarding at a minimum of 1/800th of a second (that's something some kid named "Attiba" told me blushing).

2 Weeks ago in Visual Arts
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