Hi. I'm Back. Sorta.

lol deadpool u still post?

2 Weeks ago in Off Topic

Journalism School Thread.

why do you need a portfolio? You mean journalism school for college? internship go to college - journalism program - join paper - write stuff - save for portfolio.

2 Weeks ago in Off Topic

HB Member Reputation Game

who's that?

2 Weeks ago in Off Topic

Hi. I'm Back. Sorta.

Helllllllloooooooooo.

2 Weeks ago in Off Topic

Critique Corner

vignetting doesnt work for me

2 Weeks ago in Visual Arts

Amatuerism.

go to the store, try it out, see if thats the "one for you"

2 Weeks ago in Visual Arts

War Photographers

[Quote] zoriah is the guy. he runs an internship, no more than 15 people, and he takes them to conflict areas, far as im concerned, its one of the most sought after internships for photojournalists.

2 Weeks ago in Photography

Must See: My Bahamian summer vacation (all HD)

i dont think ~~~~ has ever said what his gear was. good luck askin.

2 Weeks ago in Visual Arts

Film Preference

im gonna vouche for the delta 100. i used that for portraiture, its absolutely awesome.

2 Weeks ago in Visual Arts

Daily Snaps 4th Qtr 2008.

[Image]

2 Weeks ago in Visual Arts

gcdLXJQffZCJLWnOuG

primes are great for portraits. if your planning to shoot fast moving objects, primes arent advisable.

2 Weeks ago in Visual Arts

Daily Snaps 4th Qtr 2008.

^^^ Push processing is a term from photography, referring to a development technique that increases the speed of the film being processed. Push processing involves developing the film for longer, and/or at a higher temperature. This allows larger grains of silver to form in the emulsion, forming a darker negative. This results in a lighter print and hence an increase in the apparent film speed. The opposite of push processing is called pull processing, which decreases the speed of the processed film. It is achieved by developing the film for a shorter time, and/or at a lower temperature. Push processing is more popular than pull processing as photographers usually want to make a film faster, not slower. As such, the term push processing is sometimes used as a generic term for both push processing and pull processing. By push processing film, the film can be exposed at a higher exposure index (EI) than the manufacturer's indicated film speed, allowing the film to be used under lighting conditions that would ordinarily be too low for good exposures. However, this comes at the cost of decreased quality: artifacts such as higher contrast, lower resolution, distorted colours, increased grain, etc. are often visible on film that has been push processed. Often, film is push processed to create these artefacts as part of an artistic effect. When a film has been push or pull processed, the resulting speed is called the EI, or exposure index; the film's speed is always the manufacturer's indication. For example, an ISO 200 film could be push processed to EI 400 or pull processed to EI 100.

2 Weeks ago in Visual Arts

Daily Snaps 4th Qtr 2008.

kick, did you push those 35s?

2 Weeks ago in Visual Arts

Photography Forums

thephotoforum

2 Weeks ago in Photography

Film Preference

[Quote] open? like taking the roll out the canister? nothing a bottle opener cant do.

2 Weeks ago in Visual Arts
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