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June 20, 2008 @ 06:38 PM
DAT CAT

Post: 1090

Join Date: Apr 2007

Location: yo

my uncle has a fixie in his backyard. i'm gonna start riding it since i'm sick of this crappy mountain bike i got
June 20, 2008 @ 11:32 PM

Inactive

^^^ lol I have the opposite problem. I finally found a 63 cm tonight.

Anyone have any homies with one of these? Good/bad? I heard it has shit components...


I have never liked anything Cannondale, but that's just me.
June 21, 2008 @ 01:17 AM
Killypants

Post: 1289

Join Date: Jan 2008

Location: Portland OR to Hanov...

Oh, I didn't look at the measurements. And Schwinn also has the whack XS/S/M/L/XL sizing too. I don't know about the sizing of either of these but you should look at the KHS Flite 100, the IRO Mark V (or you can build your own), or the Mercier Kilo TT.

Edit: The IRO comes in a 62 max but it has a 59cm top tube.

Edit Edit: The XL Madison has a 59 top tube too...
June 21, 2008 @ 10:27 AM
owensA

Post: 2346

Join Date: Jul 2006

Location: Live from 215

^Schwinn make crap bikes IMO, not to mention they're owned by Pacific last time I checked lol.

I doubt the Cannondale has crap parts, they're one of the best bike companies out there and have a stellar reputation. They always put out high end cycles and field great athletes at competitions not to mention aluminum frames wouldn't be where they are w/o Cannondale. I dunno about fixed but I've bought 2 Cannondale MTBs in my lifetime ( a Killer v500 and an F400) and both have been great; quality parts, light frames, etc. I ride quite technical trails with others and my bike is by far the least often to break down and my friends all have high end bikes as well (Gary Fishers, Treks, etc.).
June 21, 2008 @ 01:13 PM

Inactive

As far as complete bikes go, I would take a look at the Specialized fixed range, they have some good bikes.

if you can afford it go for the S works frameset and build with parts you want.
I don't want owensA to take this the wrong way, but I disagree and still think Cannondales make wack bikes, particularly MTBs with the mono forks, and stupid geometry.. all just to be different... and I have seen more then 1 break, They do have good marketing tho, I give them that as most newbies would choose a Cannondale. And I wouldn't call Gary Fishers, Treks "Hi End" either! To be honest, I don't think you can get a Hi End complete bike!
Most of the "Hi End Bikes" are sold as framesets only and you build from ground up.

PS. for a fixed gear you cannot beat a lugged steel frame with say Reynolds or Columbus Tubing.
June 21, 2008 @ 02:48 PM
Killypants

Post: 1289

Join Date: Jan 2008

Location: Portland OR to Hanov...

My friend has the Specialized (the one that looks like a taxi) and when he got it three spokes were bent, and there was mad chain noise. Just FYI. I disagree with Owens as well haha, the Madison is oft argued to be the best entry-leveled fixed complete. I think Cannondales are solid as well though. And you could always get a Bianchi Pista, that's what I rode for awhile and loved it.
June 21, 2008 @ 02:50 PM
owensA

Post: 2346

Join Date: Jul 2006

Location: Live from 215

^^
With any competition level bike you aren't gonna be riding with stock parts but Cannondales tend to come with solid components, primarily some of Shimano's better parts. There's a difference b/w what is considered a high end bike and a competition level bike though. When someone would come into the shop looking for a high end road bike you'd show em say a Trek Madone or something along those lines (look at Cannondale's Super Six and tell me that's not high-end, that bike is beautiful, if only I had more cash...) or a high end MTB (Trek elite 9.9) which certainly is not a low end (Pacific) or a mid level (Shwinn) bike. I know what you're saying though when people have stock parts and think they have the most amazing ride on the trail, buying your parts is more practical and a lot of fun.

When I worked at a shop the only repeat issue that comes to mind with Cannondale completes is occasional problems on a couple models with poor Shimano BBs but that's quite minor in the grand scheme of things. I worked at the shop for a couple years and with MTBers particularly, Dales prolly had the most repeat customers but I gotta admit we live in PA and they're assembled here and bikers generally tend to have a hometown bias when it comes to purchasing frames, parts and even accessories like messenger bags (same bias I have about Fuji bikes which I also ride happily, they're now based near me in Philly not Japan). And ya some people are suspicious of the lefty shocks (im assuming that's what you're referring to as the mono fork) but they really are great products with some big advantages and despite the odd look the net force is the same and they handle as well as conventional shocks (I've had to explain this to customers far too many times lol, it's hard to convince ppl b/c they look so odd and look like they'd exert force unevenly). Look at a fighter planes landing gear and some motorcycles and they often have a one fork set up btw, so Cannondale isn't exactly first when it comes to this. If you got a buddy who has a Dale with a lefty, try it I'll assure you you'll like it. It's not so much about style>substance, personally I think conventional shocks are more aesthetically pleasing. I prolly can't much change your mind but I figured I'd defend Cannondale and give a different viewpoint as most of our customers, myself included, always seemed content with their rides. Plus that lefty really is a decent product and you should at least put it into consideration despite it's unconventional looks.

I'd like to think bicycle preference is like music though and is quite subjective, everyone likes bikes for different reasons (stiffness, weight, shape, etc.) and most people have a bike that fits them better than others (all the more reason to cop a frame and build it yourself), so to each his own. All the internet opinion in the world doesn't mean much (my own included) and there's no better advice than to get to the shop and give her a test drive, you wouldn't buy a pair of jeans without trying them on right?

Cosign on Specialied btw, they make great bikes. I rode my ex-roommates Specialized rock hopper from time to time and despite being a few cm too small I still really enjoyed my rides on it. Plus our customers always seemed pleased with their Specialized purchases.

I disagree with Owens as well haha, the Madison is oft argued to be the best entry-leveled fixed complete. I think Cannondales are solid as well though. And you could always get a Bianchi Pista, that's what I rode for awhile and loved it.


And killypants, my fault I didn't take into consideration that you were considering an entry level, you may very well be right that Schwinn makes a decent entry level fixie but in the grand scheme of things Schwinn doesn't make stellar higher end products. Of course if you're looking to spend around $500 that's the market that Schwinn tends to target and o well in. If you're looking for a higher end bike and not an entry level, I'd personally steer clear of anything Schwinn, be it fixed, road, or MTB. That's just my 2 cents.

And btw your friends issue with the Specialized is almost certainly exceptional, just make sure he contacts em and gets the problem rectified, that's definitely not normal nor indicative of Specialized's overall quality.
June 21, 2008 @ 06:14 PM
Pastiche_

Post: 167

Join Date: May 2007

Location: Atlanta

I fux with my fixie. Made from spare parts but it has a perfect cruising gear.
June 21, 2008 @ 07:38 PM
owensA

Post: 2346

Join Date: Jul 2006

Location: Live from 215

^^if u got pics put em up, I love it when ppl make their bikes from scratch
June 22, 2008 @ 11:49 AM

Inactive

^^
With any competition level bike you aren't gonna be riding with stock parts but Cannondales tend to come with solid components, primarily some of Shimano's better parts. There's a difference b/w what is considered a high end bike and a competition level bike though. When someone would come into the shop looking for a high end road bike you'd show em say a Trek Madone or something along those lines (look at Cannondale's Super Six and tell me that's not high-end, that bike is beautiful, if only I had more cash...) or a high end MTB (Trek elite 9.9) which certainly is not a low end (Pacific) or a mid level (Shwinn) bike. I know what you're saying though when people have stock parts and think they have the most amazing ride on the trail, buying your parts is more practical and a lot of fun.

When I worked at a shop the only repeat issue that comes to mind with Cannondale completes is occasional problems on a couple models with poor Shimano BBs but that's quite minor in the grand scheme of things. I worked at the shop for a couple years and with MTBers particularly, Dales prolly had the most repeat customers but I gotta admit we live in PA and they're assembled here and bikers generally tend to have a hometown bias when it comes to purchasing frames, parts and even accessories like messenger bags (same bias I have about Fuji bikes which I also ride happily, they're now based near me in Philly not Japan). And ya some people are suspicious of the lefty shocks (im assuming that's what you're referring to as the mono fork) but they really are great products with some big advantages and despite the odd look the net force is the same and they handle as well as conventional shocks (I've had to explain this to customers far too many times lol, it's hard to convince ppl b/c they look so odd and look like they'd exert force unevenly). Look at a fighter planes landing gear and some motorcycles and they often have a one fork set up btw, so Cannondale isn't exactly first when it comes to this. If you got a buddy who has a Dale with a lefty, try it I'll assure you you'll like it. It's not so much about style>substance, personally I think conventional shocks are more aesthetically pleasing. I prolly can't much change your mind but I figured I'd defend Cannondale and give a different viewpoint as most of our customers, myself included, always seemed content with their rides. Plus that lefty really is a decent product and you should at least put it into consideration despite it's unconventional looks.

I'd like to think bicycle preference is like music though and is quite subjective, everyone likes bikes for different reasons (stiffness, weight, shape, etc.) and most people have a bike that fits them better than others (all the more reason to cop a frame and build it yourself), so to each his own. All the internet opinion in the world doesn't mean much (my own included) and there's no better advice than to get to the shop and give her a test drive, you wouldn't buy a pair of jeans without trying them on right?

Cosign on Specialied btw, they make great bikes. I rode my ex-roommates Specialized rock hopper from time to time and despite being a few cm too small I still really enjoyed my rides on it. Plus our customers always seemed pleased with their Specialized purchases.



And killypants, my fault I didn't take into consideration that you were considering an entry level, you may very well be right that Schwinn makes a decent entry level fixie but in the grand scheme of things Schwinn doesn't make stellar higher end products. Of course if you're looking to spend around $500 that's the market that Schwinn tends to target and o well in. If you're looking for a higher end bike and not an entry level, I'd personally steer clear of anything Schwinn, be it fixed, road, or MTB. That's just my 2 cents.

And btw your friends issue with the Specialized is almost certainly exceptional, just make sure he contacts em and gets the problem rectified, that's definitely not normal nor indicative of Specialized's overall quality.


Granted on the Hi End vs Competition level bike definition, for a person who is buying a complete bike, most of the time the different models are just difference in components, with better parts on Higher end models, and the frameset is usually exactly the same with maybe different paint and decals.
Sometime there is a difference in tubing and angles as well but that depends on different bike companies. If you want a basic setup as an entry level ride, I would go with something that has a solid frame and then look at the components, because there is a very big chance you will be changing parts to personalize your ride or if something breaks anyway... then you'll have an excuse to change stuff lol
June 22, 2008 @ 12:42 PM
Toledus

Post: 188

Join Date: Aug 2007

Location: Carol City, FL

ive always liked the allure of fixies - the rush, aesthetics, history - but growing up in miami i grew into a scene of bmx heads and skaters so proper road bikes and fixies were kind of taboo but i have always wanted to try it. also i never realized how hipster orientated they were, but a trip to gainesville revealed this. and i was shocked, these kids were so smug and set in their ways and yet so wrong at what they were doing, apparently fixed gear bikes are used as a status symbol but none of these people could ride technically (which is by far what attracts me the most, doing bmx type stuff on a much larger frame) anyway it inspired me to take fascination and turn into something tangible. and really learning and getting in deeper than looks.

what is the best quality affordable frame and parts, or should i look into completes. also my uncle has a few road bikes in questionable condition anyway to refurbish and convert? because the size is nice.
June 22, 2008 @ 11:47 PM

Inactive

ive always liked the allure of fixies - the rush, aesthetics, history - but growing up in miami i grew into a scene of bmx heads and skaters so proper road bikes and fixies were kind of taboo but i have always wanted to try it. also i never realized how hipster orientated they were, but a trip to gainesville revealed this. and i was shocked, these kids were so smug and set in their ways and yet so wrong at what they were doing, apparently fixed gear bikes are used as a status symbol but none of these people could ride technically (which is by far what attracts me the most, doing bmx type stuff on a much larger frame) anyway it inspired me to take fascination and turn into something tangible. and really learning and getting in deeper than looks.

what is the best quality affordable frame and parts, or should i look into completes. also my uncle has a few road bikes in questionable condition anyway to refurbish and convert? because the size is nice.


Yeah well unfortunately those hipsters exists everywhere... A lot of ppl "ride" for the wrong reasons.
If you want something affordable, get a complete bike but do check they have a proper cog and lock ring, if you strip the threads on your hub then you'll need a new wheel or re-lace a new hub. That is the most common problem with bikes which are poorly assembled at "normal" bike shops.
If you want to convert a road bike, you'll need to do a fair bit of research, could be fun if you know what you're doing but also could be a long wait on parts and turn into a real nightmare... totally depends on what you have and your knowledge on getting fixed. I would check the drop outs on those road bike frames first tho...
June 23, 2008 @ 05:07 PM
Killypants

Post: 1289

Join Date: Jan 2008

Location: Portland OR to Hanov...

^you want horizontal rear dropouts.
June 26, 2008 @ 08:31 AM

Inactive

New Project...


June 28, 2008 @ 05:30 PM
G60

Post: 164

Join Date: Sep 2007

Location: Fresno, CA

^^^ lol I have the opposite problem. I finally found a 63 cm tonight.

Anyone have any homies with one of these? Good/bad? I heard it has shit components...


the capo has a great frame, i love mine. the components do leave a little bit to be desired, but components aren't a big deal with a fixed gear anyways, what is there to upgrade? the crankset maybe? wheelset which you'd end up changing out on any bike?

track bikes aren't road bikes, there's no need to get all worried about the right groupset or something.
June 30, 2008 @ 05:52 PM
outlawzsm

Post: 2850

Join Date: Mar 2006

Location: US of A

whats a good online site to purchase one, say a Bianchi?
June 30, 2008 @ 06:19 PM
owensA

Post: 2346

Join Date: Jul 2006

Location: Live from 215

dunno but if you dont know your road/track frame size make sure you ride the bike before hand in order to make sure you know what size frame you're gonna need (sorry if i'm stating the obvious, but if this is the first bike you've bout in some time you might need to determine size)
June 30, 2008 @ 08:42 PM
outlawzsm

Post: 2850

Join Date: Mar 2006

Location: US of A

Thanks for the advice, just bought a Fuji Track. I'll get acquainted with riding track (been riding a road bike for the last 4 years) and move up.
July 1, 2008 @ 12:38 PM
ImperiusRex

Post: 696

Join Date: Sep 2007

Location: Houston TX, by way o...

how much would a chepo fixxie run me? not new, i jus wanna try one out ta see what all the hype is about. from the vid ive seen on youtube, looks like a good work out and seems like fun. no one around me rides em so i cant really test one...
July 1, 2008 @ 03:16 PM
owensA

Post: 2346

Join Date: Jul 2006

Location: Live from 215

^^you can always go to the bike shop and ask for a test drive of a fixie, most shops should have some ready to be test driven as fixies are currently becoming pretty popular. Or if you live near a city, go down town and especially around lunch or the end of the day, bike messengers (several of whom ride fixed) tend to chill in certain parks or areas around down town and I bet you'd be allowed to jump on for a quick ride. These ppl bike for a living so they should be accommodating.

And check craigslist or maybe even ebay if you're looking for a used model, just make sure you get the right frame size!
July 1, 2008 @ 03:36 PM
kenyathez17

Post: 71

Join Date: Jun 2007

busted ass for the first time on my fixie yesterday, my knee is a little bruised up but i can't let the cannondale down and not ride her!
it's like 110 in PHX today so i basically sweated buckets riding to and from school.
July 6, 2008 @ 04:36 AM

Inactive

Just got back from Tokyo, some local bike pics









a gift from a friend in Tokyo.



July 17, 2008 @ 12:39 PM
DjBooduh209

Post: 637

Join Date: Apr 2006

Location: Stockton-San Francis...

more pics on my blog






July 29, 2008 @ 12:14 PM
Whizz

Post: 281

Join Date: Feb 2006

Location: UK Baby

Booduh you got two of my favourite frames in the Pista Concept and the Cinelli Vigorelli.

How's the Aerospokes riding? I hear they're like dog shit in a crosswind?

Well this is my fixed. Probably the most hated OTP bike in the UK.



I'm planning on upgrading the wheels in the next week or so because the standard Alex rims and hubs are pretty shitty. Apart from that, it's a very smooth and light ride.
July 30, 2008 @ 12:50 AM
Space Dandy

suspended

Post: 3633

Join Date: Dec 2006

heres mine
July 30, 2008 @ 12:48 PM
Killypants

Post: 1289

Join Date: Jan 2008

Location: Portland OR to Hanov...

Cam, I have a pair of powdercoated Dp18s on the way, I'll let you know how they are
August 7, 2008 @ 02:31 AM
DjBooduh209

Post: 637

Join Date: Apr 2006

Location: Stockton-San Francis...

dope ride and pic whizz!! hahaha yeah they do suck in crosswind. Any trispoke, five spoke, ect. sicks in crosswind except for spinergy.

More pics on my blog!!



August 8, 2008 @ 12:38 AM
20hundred

Post: 1347

Join Date: Nov 2006

phone pic will upload better one tomorrowzz

August 8, 2008 @ 08:07 AM
noppe

Post: 48

Join Date: May 2008

^sweet colourway
August 8, 2008 @ 01:37 PM
Whizz

Post: 281

Join Date: Feb 2006

Location: UK Baby

dope ride and pic whizz!! hahaha yeah they do suck in crosswind. Any trispoke, five spoke, ect. sicks in crosswind except for spinergy.

More pics on my blog!!


Cheers Bood. Yeah I got the wants after seeing your pics so I ended up buying an Aerospoke off ebay. Trouble is it's black and looks all wrong on my bike. Thinking of spraying it white but I'm worried about stripping it down.

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