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September 11, 2007 @ 09:02 PM
BillionaireBoy

Post: 413

Join Date: Apr 2007

Location: San Francisco,CA

What are the main differences between streetwear and urbanwear? When I try to explain the difference I say streetwear is more creative and original. I also think there's more skill in streetwear graphics as opposed to slapping logos on a rocawear t shirt and calling it a day. Also, I've never seen a medium in any urban clothing company in stores.
September 11, 2007 @ 09:55 PM
Deemy

Post: 1835

Join Date: Aug 2006

From my experience, streetwear products are usually made by companies such as Orisue, Stussy, Mishka while urbanwear are often mass-made for the consumers that live in cities and can't afford streetwear. Those products are often branded by Rocawear, Avirex, Sean John, etc.
September 11, 2007 @ 10:07 PM
MrSickVisionz

Post: 290

Join Date: Jan 2007

Location: Atlanta

LOL @ these replies.
September 11, 2007 @ 10:17 PM
The24th

Post: 251

Join Date: Jul 2007

Location: CALIFORNIA

two totally different styles of clothing that shouldnt even be mentioned in the same sentence.
September 11, 2007 @ 11:30 PM
modernART

Post: 2584

Join Date: Feb 2006

Location: Anywhere, LTD

I hate using categories and subsidiaries in the first place when it comes to clothing, but i guess it's just inevitable.

When I mention Streetwear I usually just keep it simple by saying it's an independent, lifestyle-directed company that doesn't mass produce or feed into huge corporate fashion schemes. I wouldn't want to politic and get into the entire culture and stuff, so I just dodge it altogether.
September 11, 2007 @ 11:57 PM
Fishscale

Post: 1594

Join Date: Jun 2006

I think in the past few years the two have really merged somewhat and the lines have sort of been blurred. When you look at all the new brands that have come out recently, it seems as if they simply take a look at what the creative, original, and in my eyes the more legit brands are doing and trying to emulate them to make a quick buck. All over prints for example went from being used solely by "streetwear" brands for a period of time to soon being found all over malls. To me there's really three catagories..."streetwear", "urbanwear", and then companies that try to tap into the "streetwear" market but fail to have any originality so it all ends up looking like cheap, tacky "urbanwear" but selling to the new market of "streetwear" customers that can't tell the difference between the two.

I definitely know the difference between the two but I feel that there's so many wack brands out there that try so hard to emulate the more authentic street brands, which in the end confuses many customers who really don't know what they're buying. In the end it's basically filtering out the die hard customers who truly support good, independent brands that are off doing their own thing versus the customers who are just buying into the hype of it all.
September 12, 2007 @ 12:06 AM
elprezzo

Post: 307

Join Date: May 2006

urbanwear is just hip hop and urban inspired clothing companies...streetwear has really branched out to encompass more than just one demographic, so its really imo about being cutting edge and controversial with the items and graphics etc, that you wouldnt see on a more commercial clothing brand...

...I love the fact that streetwear companies have customers such as myself, a hip hop head and overall fresh *****, and punk rock cats, and surf cats for example, all rockin the same shit, even tho we dont share a lot of the same interests.

...hip hop and "urban" clothes almost had the same results, but they sold out for the quick buck rather than continuing to push the envelope...and dont forget y'all that the heads and leading designers at the leading streetwear brands we love all had or have day jobs at "Urban" clothing companies such as rocawear, phat farm, 555 soul, ecko ultd., etc...

bottom line, urbanwear used to have shit I liked ( back in the 90s) that fit me the way I liked, but if you are a stylish person, u want the exclusive shit and stuff cats dotn know about yet, and that lead me to streetwear ish...cause I could sport a crooks, hundreds, even a stussy shirt, and most people wont know what it is, even in LA which is pretty much like NY with the streetwear ish now...
September 12, 2007 @ 12:13 AM
hypism

Post: 231

Join Date: Mar 2007

while urbanwear are often mass-made for the consumers that live in cities and can't afford streetwear.

lmao damn. Is this where streetwear is going? Shit.

Most "city people that can't afford streetwear" don't want to wear streetwear shit in the first place. Streetwear kids would get made fun of in the hood.
September 12, 2007 @ 12:14 AM
Ma Duce

Post: 3395

Join Date: Nov 2006

Location: intergalactic

haha damn, this thread seems to come up over and over again.


who cares? why do there need to be names? wear what you like, and that's that.

lions don't lose sleep over the opinions of sheep.

September 12, 2007 @ 12:54 AM
BillionaireBoy

Post: 413

Join Date: Apr 2007

Location: San Francisco,CA

haha damn, this thread seems to come up over and over again.


who cares? why do there need to be names? wear what you like, and that's that.


It's stupid to say things don't need names or genres. Of course they do. It's just like when people say music doesn't need genres. "Rock" could be anything from matchbox 20 to led zepplin to cannibal corpse. Sure some get carried away with labels but that doesn't mean some aren't necessary.

I was asking this particular question because when people ask what my style is or what I wear, when I say streetwear they think phat farm or akademiks. Since they wont have heard of most brands in the streetwear game, giving a differentiating description would be better.
September 12, 2007 @ 12:58 AM
Japan4

Post: 1689

Join Date: May 2006

Location: Babylon

streetwear is gully....streetwear steals logos and bites so much shit, then flips it. Streetwear is like crack....urban wear is like cocaine. Somewhere in the mix you add baking soda which is.......oh yeah...hypebeast.

rilly doe?

September 12, 2007 @ 01:08 AM
Ma Duce

Post: 3395

Join Date: Nov 2006

Location: intergalactic

i didn't say "things" don't need genres. i simply meant that i think "streetwear vs. urbanwear" is a frivolous topic that comes frequently on here.

but i suppose your reason for brining it up is a legitimate one, since it can get frustrating when people assume that.

lions don't lose sleep over the opinions of sheep.

September 12, 2007 @ 01:15 AM
Wu Dynasty

Post: 368

Join Date: Mar 2006

From my experience, streetwear products are usually made by companies such as Orisue, Stussy, Mishka while urbanwear are often mass-made for the consumers that live in cities and can't afford streetwear. Those products are often branded by Rocawear, Avirex, Sean John, etc.


I don't think price is an issue. Sean John stuff is actually pretty expensive.
September 12, 2007 @ 11:11 AM
Gaberockka

Post: 176

Join Date: Aug 2007

Location: Brooklyn

urbanwear is just hip hop and urban inspired clothing companies...streetwear has really branched out to encompass more than just one demographic, so its really imo about being cutting edge and controversial with the items and graphics etc, that you wouldnt see on a more commercial clothing brand...

...I love the fact that streetwear companies have customers such as myself, a hip hop head and overall fresh *****, and punk rock cats, and surf cats for example, all rockin the same shit, even tho we dont share a lot of the same interests.


Couldn't have put it better myself. One of the things I like about this scene or whatever you want to call it, is that you can be a metalhead, punk, skater, surfer, hip hop head, etc. and you will be able to find something that appeals to you within the streetwear umbrella. The companies have superficial ideological differences, like one label may be more influenced by hip hop culture and another may be influenced by rock, but they all share deeper values like originality, quality, attention to detail, and exclusivity. Not all streetwear brands value originality or details but the ones that I support do.
September 12, 2007 @ 04:37 PM
Bones

Post: 287

Join Date: Sep 2006

Location: Chicago

Urbanwear is for homos and fags
Streetwear is for super homos and super fags

YAY!!!
September 12, 2007 @ 05:32 PM
dtrader

Post: 592

Join Date: Mar 2007

Location: MIAMI

Urbanwear companies are streetwear companies that have mature and/or change their business model, shifting from one based largely on exclusivity to one based on increasing market share and brand recognition. At least from a business class perspective I think that would begin to cover it. In terms of styles it obviously doesn't. Style wise "urban wear" has more of a connection to hip hop/pop (Probably because shoppers interested in that style spend the most and comprise the largest consumer group for apparel). Streetwear is more diverse in it's cultural connections and has a less predictable consumer base (leading it's labels to be smaller/more boutique oriented). For alot of "streetwear" labels to grow substantially, their designs would probably have to be bastardized and watered down in order to fit into the tighter standards of larger distributers/department stores (picture Macy's stocking Mishka's "get a job" lol). Alot of those changes would probably be intended to make the offerings target consumer clearer...that would likely lead the line to become "urbanwear" as any experimental subject matter, or rock/hip hop interconnections were cut to help departmentalize the labels instore. Lol. =My thesis.
September 12, 2007 @ 05:58 PM
Gaberockka

Post: 176

Join Date: Aug 2007

Location: Brooklyn

Urbanwear companies are streetwear companies that have mature and/or change their business model, shifting from one based largely on exclusivity to one based on increasing market share and brand recognition. At least from a business class perspective I think that would begin to cover it. In terms of styles it obviously doesn't. Style wise "urban wear" has more of a connection to hip hop/pop (Probably because shoppers interested in that style spend the most and comprise the largest consumer group for apparel). Streetwear is more diverse in it's cultural connections and has a less predictable consumer base (leading it's labels to be smaller/more boutique oriented). For alot of "streetwear" labels to grow substantially, their designs would probably have to be bastardized and watered down in order to fit into the tighter standards of larger distributers/department stores (picture Macy's stocking Mishka's "get a job" lol). Alot of those changes would probably be intended to make the offerings target consumer clearer...that would likely lead the line to become "urbanwear" as any experimental subject matter, or rock/hip hop interconnections were cut to help departmentalize the labels instore. Lol. =My thesis.


That was pretty impressive. One thing I have to point out though, is that in another thread several people confirmed that the more popular streetwear labels like crooks, 10deep, etc. have been approached by large chain stores, even department stores, and not given them accounts because of integrity. I can't confirm that's true at all by the way. But maybe it is... I just wanted to point it out because the company's would possibly be staying small and boutique oriented by choice rather than being an almost embryonic version of an urbanwear label like you postulated.
September 12, 2007 @ 07:03 PM
dtrader

Post: 592

Join Date: Mar 2007

Location: MIAMI

I'm sure there are a handful of clothing lines that have actually made a choice to stay small to preserve their "streetwear" distinction, but for most brands I think it's an end decision that their means made for them. There was that big discussion about marc ecko and the stick up kid shirt on here before, and this topic kinda relates back to that. Ecko probably started as what could be called a "streetwear" label, but as it grew into new areas, it's product kept getting watered down until it didn't stand out from all the other lines and became "urbanwear". That "negative" effect gave marc the means he has now to look at other ventures in "streetwear". People were saying he was looking to buy 10deep or some other smaller label. Once he does, I'm sure it will start becoming "urbanwear," as his business model clearly revolves around expansion. Supreme is maybe an example of what you're talking about. It definitely has a strong enough following to expand into more locations, raise capital through expansion, and do brand mergers/acquisitions if it wants. Instead it chooses to stay independant and stand for authenticity and excellence within its niche market. It'll never make the money ecko does because of that decision, but the brand may have a longer lifespan and more dedicated following instead.
September 13, 2007 @ 09:16 AM
MrSickVisionz

Post: 290

Join Date: Jan 2007

Location: Atlanta

I think streetwear is more punk rock based while urbanwear is more hip-hop based.

The major difference that I see isn't really in the design of the clothes. Punkrock and hip-hop both share a similar mindstate of doing whatever you want and not caring what others think, so there is alot of crossover. The main difference is who its targeted to:

Just looking at this thread, streetwear head's are elitist. You slap ANYTHING on a shirt, only print up 100 and charge $40, thats instantly considered a well designed peice of clothing. Exclusivity is what makes the clothes nice. They'll say that they don't want to wear what "everyone else is wearing" and that they are creative and original... but if you put 100 of these "original" kids in a room, 90% of them will be dressed up in the same shit with the only difference being the company name on the tag.

Hip-hop was never about being some private thing that excludes people. I highly disagree that one is more authentic/creative than the other. It was always about taking your message to the masses when the masses were ignoring you. You'd make it so big that they didn't have any choice but to pay attention. Thats why for companies based off of that, expanding the line isn't seen as blasphemy. It makes sense. Mission achieved. You sell clothing... why would you not want to sell clothing? If you didn't want to sell clothing, why are you in the fashion business? If I seel my close @ Macy's, i'm a sellout? If I sell my clothes at a small store, thats keeping it real? How? More people can buy my clothes so i'm fake? That doesn't make any sense to the urbanwear person. Thats how the urbanwear companies view it.

I challenge anyone to do this: Just look at the designs of both genres. You'll notice alot of trends that everyone in that genre seems to be following. You'll also notice things that are different that certain companies do. Be able to seperate, "bad" from "I don't like".
September 13, 2007 @ 09:43 AM
Gaberockka

Post: 176

Join Date: Aug 2007

Location: Brooklyn

People were saying he was looking to buy 10deep or some other smaller label.



In that same thread, wasn't that debunked as baseless rumor? Not that it devalidates your point...
September 13, 2007 @ 11:46 AM
tommyroks

Post: 4408

Join Date: Jul 2006

Location: queens

so if i wear ecko & crooks at the same time.
Does that make me urbanwear X streetwear?
September 13, 2007 @ 12:07 PM
emmanuelabor

Post: 829

Join Date: Feb 2006

Location: Seattle

to me, the major difference is where each is sold.

once something is sold in a dept. store, I think it would lose its streetwear "credibility"(whatever that is)

another huge difference in my eyes is that streetwear is highly derivative. flipping of logos or reusing popular themes. A VAST majority of streetwear is derived from something people are already familiar with whether it be a Biggie or Wu tang rap lyric, or an image of Paris Hilton or George Bush thats been photoshopped to serve another purpose or pass on a message.

something sold in a dept. store probably cant get away with that. it cant take the risks that a smaller independent streetwear brand could.


I really dont think rock or hip hop have much to do with any of it considering its getting to the point that everybody listens to everything nowdays. Urban and street are almost synonymous depending on how you look at it so....
September 13, 2007 @ 02:39 PM
dtrader

Post: 592

Join Date: Mar 2007

Location: MIAMI

Gaberockka...That probably was just a rumor, but I doubt anyone that actually posted has the connections to really know. I def. don't. Example just suited me at the time.

Def. wasn't gonna write another essay status post for this thread, but I'm super bored at work and actually like the convo so...

MrSickVisionz Misconceptions

Alot of what defined early hip hop (origination of slang terminology, creation of "crews", "underground" events), WAS in fact exclusionary (although at times unintentionally). I mean...it doesn't make sense to come up with slang (coded language) if your goal is to reach as many people as possible. "Slang" definiton- "Slang is a type of sociolect aimed at excluding certain people from the conversation. Slang initially functions as encryption, so that the non-initiate cannot understand the conversation, or as a further way to communicate with those who understand it."- wikipedia
Drawing a comparison between the spread of hip hop and the expansion of a clothing line is also rough. "In the early days everything about Hip-Hop was illegal. Graffiti art was (and mostly still is) against the law, and deejaying and emceeing became illegal when rap duos would take their equipment to the park and plug into lampposts for power, an unlawful act. This section is especially important when you consider that back in the early days of Hip-Hop, the early heads would actually regularly go to jail for this culture."-KRS1 lecture on Hip Hop fundamentals. You say "why would you not want to sell clothing?...your in the fashion business?...but for hip hop it's like asking why wouldn't you want to sell pieces of your culture to the people that used to imprison you? Early hip hop heads were involved before a business even existed to be a part of, so when they saw and continue to see it spread to groups not initially involved, alot of times they're suspicious of the motives (is it just for moneyconfused and consider it a misrepresentation of their culture...similar to the watered down Mishka shirt in Macy's. It's not a sellout because of the store it's sold in, it's a sellout because they changed the product to suit the store, when originally the shirt was about the message on it.
I think alot of streetwear heads appreciate limited designs cuz they know most people that have that same shirt as them, connect with the design in the same way. Like the Straight Laced x Lupe shirt. It's just a picture of an ice cube melting on a plain black t with "the cool" text, sold at 1 store+limited to 100. If that shirt had 10,000 copies in walmart, it would be bought by people that like pink and blue, people that liked ice cubes, people that thought they'd be "cool", etc. With only 100 printed and limited advertising, you can be pretty sure that whoever has that shirt really is a lupe fan. Some may have elitist motives, but I'm sure most bought it cuz their interest was "real"

Title was just a joke by the way sick...def. not serious/disrespect/flame etc
September 13, 2007 @ 03:50 PM
HB ruin mylife

Post: 1438

Join Date: Mar 2007

wow there is maaaaad shit to read in this thread, why we gotta write a thesis for this mang, its all in the same to me,.....yall shouldnt be conformed to one type of style anyways
September 13, 2007 @ 05:51 PM
hypism

Post: 231

Join Date: Mar 2007

I live in an area where the majority of people wear "urban wear" and I see so many 10 Deep fakes. It's hilarious.

Sometimes I just want to go up to them and say "You know that's fake right?" but I'd feel bad.
September 13, 2007 @ 10:30 PM
Like_Clockwork

Post: 388

Join Date: Sep 2007

Location: Falcon, Colorado =[

pwnd
shoes and skatin (9:25:10 PM): i dont dig the baggy fit im more of a tapered and straight and sometimes skinny type guy
D3Fyniti0n (9:25:33 PM): the skater level
D3Fyniti0n (9:25:34 PM): i know
D3Fyniti0n (9:25:38 PM): i'm the loose kind
D3Fyniti0n (9:25:43 PM): straight urban
shoes and skatin (9:25:38 PM): urbans groose
shoes and skatin (9:25:42 PM): gross*
D3Fyniti0n (9:25:57 PM): lmao
shoes and skatin (9:25:47 PM): i like more streetwear type stuff
D3Fyniti0n (9:26:10 PM): urban is street wear ahah
shoes and skatin (9:26:05 PM): HAHAHAHAHA
D3Fyniti0n (9:26:17 PM): skatign is just skating
shoes and skatin (9:26:46 PM): some companies are skating influenced

what a dumby razz
September 14, 2007 @ 09:09 AM
Birdman Jr

Post: 105

Join Date: Feb 2006

Location: NY

From my experience, streetwear products are usually made by companies such as Orisue, Stussy, Mishka while urbanwear are often mass-made for the consumers that live in cities and can't afford streetwear. Those products are often branded by Rocawear, Avirex, Sean John, etc.


Sean john, rocawear, avirex, and whatever costs way more than streetwear lol. c'mon, $30 tees. lets be serious.
September 14, 2007 @ 11:12 AM
emmanuelabor

Post: 829

Join Date: Feb 2006

Location: Seattle

way more?

wtf?!?!
September 14, 2007 @ 11:35 AM
Gaberockka

Post: 176

Join Date: Aug 2007

Location: Brooklyn

T-Shirts from Maharishi (high end UK streetwear label) often retail for as much as $400 USD.
September 14, 2007 @ 01:56 PM
Like_Clockwork

Post: 388

Join Date: Sep 2007

Location: Falcon, Colorado =[

Sean john, rocawear, avirex, and whatever costs way more than streetwear lol. c'mon, $30 tees. lets be serious.


i hope thats sarcasm if not SMH >sad

PS the again your sn is birdman jr

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