Labor Day - Enjoy 25% Off Your Order. Use code: LABORDAY25
May 17, 2012 @ 09:15 AM
flauwekul

Post: 56

Join Date: May 2012

Here are some designs i already made, please give me some feedback, good or bad.
Please click right mouse, and then click show these in other window to see the high quality versions cause in some that is important to do.







www.flauwekul.in - www.koenroetman.nl

May 17, 2012 @ 09:22 AM
welchy3

Post: 123

Join Date: May 2010




you prefer woven tags or printed?


Woven for sure imo. Unless your printing onto something unique.

why? what does uniqueness have to do with anything?

Well firstly, I think its important to be unique in anything you put out so it has lots to do with it. Regular printed tags looks cheap imo. Ive seen it done on some thicker canvas materials etc... and its come out nice and more "heritage."
May 17, 2012 @ 09:24 AM
BespokeCS

Post: 50

Join Date: Apr 2012

Had extra crewnecks laying around heres what we did with them:



love it.
May 17, 2012 @ 09:39 AM
qrct1

Post: 1035

Join Date: May 2012




you prefer woven tags or printed?

Woven for sure imo. Unless your printing onto something unique.

why? what does uniqueness have to do with anything?

Well firstly, I think its important to be unique in anything you put out so it has lots to do with it. Regular printed tags looks cheap imo. Ive seen it done on some thicker canvas materials etc... and its come out nice and more "heritage."


not trying to step on any toes here, but I've noticed that the tags on Supreme aren't woven.. Just an observation I've made. Not saying Supreme is exemplary. Just something I've noticed.

I guess I'm still on the fence on this tag issue.

aeterna13.com

May 17, 2012 @ 02:33 PM
karakter1

Post: 592

Join Date: Jun 2006

I used printed and woven tags...

i just personally liked the woven tags better.....

on the biz side, the switch to woven really didn't cost much per tee to effect the margins.
but...brands seem to sell equal amounts from printed fabric tags, to woven, to tagless labels printed directly on the tees...so does either option effect sales at all?....id say no. go with your preference.
May 17, 2012 @ 03:38 PM
DOOOM

Post: 25

Join Date: Nov 2011

Location: London




Looking good.

www.iamdooom.com

May 17, 2012 @ 03:39 PM
qrct1

Post: 1035

Join Date: May 2012

I used printed and woven tags...

i just personally liked the woven tags better.....

on the biz side, the switch to woven really didn't cost much per tee to effect the margins.
but...brands seem to sell equal amounts from printed fabric tags, to woven, to tagless labels printed directly on the tees...so does either option effect sales at all?....id say no. go with your preference.

Good read.
I guess it's one of those seemingly insignificant things that designers take control over to make that extra step in thoughtful detail.

aeterna13.com

May 17, 2012 @ 04:50 PM
SoulBrotha

Post: 88

Join Date: Dec 2011

Location: Texas

Had extra crewnecks laying around heres what we did with them:




If you made that navy blue with red/white letters i would cop in an instant

Big Belts

May 17, 2012 @ 04:54 PM
karakter1

Post: 592

Join Date: Jun 2006

i guess its all significant when you are starting up.........but as you progress you will see which things are necessary and which are just costing you money.

when selling in boutiques, most stores like to display, package and sell all tees the same way.

but on your own website, it might be nice to make for a unique shopping experience....but then again, if you have good designs, decent tees and good customer service/shipping, you can make due with the basic and still have a happy customer base. its all preference.
May 17, 2012 @ 05:08 PM
AndyRocksBluu

Post: 318

Join Date: Jun 2011

Location: Long Island, NY

Hearteat tees...thoughts?

www.LiveLoveURBAN.com



Some times to many color options can confuse the customer and leave them buying nothing because they can't make up their mind. Just my two cents

http://bluudreams.com/ #DiveIn

May 17, 2012 @ 05:12 PM
AndyRocksBluu

Post: 318

Join Date: Jun 2011

Location: Long Island, NY

this is one of four designs i'm releasing on June 8th.


Can't go wrong with black on white. Nice stuff

http://bluudreams.com/ #DiveIn

May 17, 2012 @ 05:40 PM
Broken Bank Clo

Post: 526

Join Date: Apr 2009

Location: San Diego

venting/

Getting people to notice and hit your site is the biggest thing and a PITA

I use a lot of key hit words in the blog for when people search certain terms but trying to turn them into purchases is fustrating at times.

Only way I have been able to increase traffic is eBay but trying to "trick" people into purchasing from my webstore rather then eBay has not really worked out like I want.

Broken Bank Clothing *** www.BrokenBankClothing.com *** @brokenbankclo

May 17, 2012 @ 05:45 PM
Broken Bank Clo

Post: 526

Join Date: Apr 2009

Location: San Diego

Had extra crewnecks laying around heres what we did with them:





oh yeah clean stuff bro. Looks like a really clean well put together design.

And a FYI for anyone purchasing crewneck sweats in something I notice so you don't really waste your money on buying samples

50/50 blends fit smaller then 100-90/10-80/20 cotton crewnecks.

I have been doing some test washes
FOTL 100-80/20 cotton blends shrink something horrible. And I would not reccomend them.
Gildan 50/50 have minimum shrinking but it's more of a all-around 1/2-1" shrink
I'm not using Hanes so I'll hit back with the results on those.


Good info for your customers.

Broken Bank Clothing *** www.BrokenBankClothing.com *** @brokenbankclo

May 17, 2012 @ 06:10 PM
qrct1

Post: 1035

Join Date: May 2012

Had extra crewnecks laying around heres what we did with them:





oh yeah clean stuff bro. Looks like a really clean well put together design.

And a FYI for anyone purchasing crewneck sweats in something I notice so you don't really waste your money on buying samples

50/50 blends fit smaller then 100-90/10-80/20 cotton crewnecks.

I have been doing some test washes
FOTL 100-80/20 cotton blends shrink something horrible. And I would not reccomend them.
Gildan 50/50 have minimum shrinking but it's more of a all-around 1/2-1" shrink
I'm not using Hanes so I'll hit back with the results on those.


Good info for your customers.


Gildan > FOTL
got it.
I've heard that Undefeated prints on Beimar crewnecks...
any opinions on Beimar?

aeterna13.com

May 17, 2012 @ 06:45 PM
fraserprime

Post: 6

Join Date: May 2012

ALL KINGS DIE Brand started recently. Based in Scotland.





This piece is all about our streets, our city, our Glasgow. Inspired by the city's long dead tobacco kings dubbed the "Virginia Dons", its all about that Kings Life. Make these streets your own.

the first one is so sweet!


The line is dope, glad to see fellow scottish hypebeasts!

How did you get the photographs for your tees? Did you hire a photographer, are these your own or are they stock photos?


Can someone tell me the best way to do tees like this? How do you get the photographs, should i look for photographers or what? I dont know where to start!
May 17, 2012 @ 07:03 PM
DannyHH

Post: 553

Join Date: Dec 2006

Location: United States

Had extra crewnecks laying around heres what we did with them:




If you made that navy blue with red/white letters i would cop in an instant


thanks for the idea might have to do it come winter time or maybe soon lol.
May 17, 2012 @ 07:24 PM
OR NAH

Post: 2498

Join Date: May 2011

Location: Philly

Thanks for the input i see what you are saying about the strokes...

I like having different themes though i feel as if i can appeal to a bigger audience it would turn out better plus streetwear has alot of different themes so might aswell have more then one in a brand..

Thats just how i see it not trying to argue

where the azn girls at

May 17, 2012 @ 09:20 PM
chads

Post: 1566

Join Date: Dec 2011

Location: Vermont

Thanks for the input i see what you are saying about the strokes...

I like having different themes though i feel as if i can appeal to a bigger audience it would turn out better plus streetwear has alot of different themes so might aswell have more then one in a brand..

Thats just how i see it not trying to argue

I understand what you are saying totally but I still think it is a silly idea. Yes streetwear has many different styles but these all come from different brands rather than one. The problem with trying to appeal to too many different audiences in that you don't end up having a true brand identity. For instance, when I see Undefeated I think military type styling or for a brand like Hall of Fame I think of very sports oriented design. If you are to try to appeal to too many people then you will have no true brand identity and people will be confused. With the clothing market being so saturated by shitty 'up and coming streetwear brands', the customer is looking for meaning and a brand to follow because it means something to them. If all you have is a hodgepodge of different styles then my prediction is that you will fail. So please take that into consideration and really think about what you like and what you want to do.

chadacadabra.tumblr.com

May 17, 2012 @ 09:36 PM
stillwild

Post: 560

Join Date: Jan 2012

Location: US

Preview.

Concrete Jungle, Twenty Eight Grams' first collection coming late 2012.


www.stillwild.co / online store that celebrates nature!

May 17, 2012 @ 09:40 PM
stillwild

Post: 560

Join Date: Jan 2012

Location: US

Thanks for the input i see what you are saying about the strokes...

I like having different themes though i feel as if i can appeal to a bigger audience it would turn out better plus streetwear has alot of different themes so might aswell have more then one in a brand..

Thats just how i see it not trying to argue

I understand what you are saying totally but I still think it is a silly idea. Yes streetwear has many different styles but these all come from different brands rather than one. The problem with trying to appeal to too many different audiences in that you don't end up having a true brand identity. For instance, when I see Undefeated I think military type styling or for a brand like Hall of Fame I think of very sports oriented design. If you are to try to appeal to too many people then you will have no true brand identity and people will be confused. With the clothing market being so saturated by shitty 'up and coming streetwear brands', the customer is looking for meaning and a brand to follow because it means something to them. If all you have is a hodgepodge of different styles then my prediction is that you will fail. So please take that into consideration and really think about what you like and what you want to do.


^ this.

Brands who succeed have a unified brand mission. You will NEVER (more than likely) see a jack of all trades brand succeed. Take my own brand for example, Twenty Eight Grams, sure we're committed to producing quality, minimalistic goods, and that in and of itself is a broad category. To narrow our market focus and capture consumers, we're focused on eco-friendly hipsters within the streetwear market.

Take Stussy even, much more established than I. When they wanted to open a new market (lifestyle); they produced stussy housewares, a separate entity, because their flagship brand, stussy is dedicated to a different market, and it simply wouldn't make sense to target them.

Get it?

www.stillwild.co / online store that celebrates nature!

May 18, 2012 @ 12:08 AM
qrct1

Post: 1035

Join Date: May 2012

Thanks for the input i see what you are saying about the strokes...

I like having different themes though i feel as if i can appeal to a bigger audience it would turn out better plus streetwear has alot of different themes so might aswell have more then one in a brand..

Thats just how i see it not trying to argue

I understand what you are saying totally but I still think it is a silly idea. Yes streetwear has many different styles but these all come from different brands rather than one. The problem with trying to appeal to too many different audiences in that you don't end up having a true brand identity. For instance, when I see Undefeated I think military type styling or for a brand like Hall of Fame I think of very sports oriented design. If you are to try to appeal to too many people then you will have no true brand identity and people will be confused. With the clothing market being so saturated by shitty 'up and coming streetwear brands', the customer is looking for meaning and a brand to follow because it means something to them. If all you have is a hodgepodge of different styles then my prediction is that you will fail. So please take that into consideration and really think about what you like and what you want to do.


^ this.

Brands who succeed have a unified brand mission. You will NEVER (more than likely) see a jack of all trades brand succeed. Take my own brand for example, Twenty Eight Grams, sure we're committed to producing quality, minimalistic goods, and that in and of itself is a broad category. To narrow our market focus and capture consumers, we're focused on eco-friendly hipsters within the streetwear market.

Take Stussy even, much more established than I. When they wanted to open a new market (lifestyle); they produced stussy housewares, a separate entity, because their flagship brand, stussy is dedicated to a different market, and it simply wouldn't make sense to target them.

Get it?


IMO it's not something to get. I don't think it's a good idea to get all caught up with this abstract "dream" message type ideal. It's absolutely necessary, but trying to force "culture" or "lifestyle" into your brand is different from letting the customer define your brand.

If you have that ideal, sure, good for you.
If you're kind of just aimlessly doing whatever, I think that's fine. You might specialize and the
style/aesthetic of your brand may mature to accommodate to a specific target market as you
spend more time in the industry, but it may even be the best thing about your brand -
that you are trying to appeal to a larger audience.
Who knows? it may even be your demise.

I feel like there is something wrong these days just with how a product being limited is automatically tied to some kind of magical demand. James Bond of Undefeated in a recent interview seeks to expand his brand, eyeing the business model of Footlocker to add more flagship stores and to bring UNDFTD footwear into the mall retail shops at Footlocker. He says you're either moving "with or without us", and as bold as it is, I see that as a healthy mindset for heading your own brand. Many would agree that the more important factor for success is to be able to express oneself, be pleased with oneself, "instead of second-guessing what a client wants"

I also agree with him in that the sneakerhead audience is rather small and limiting to the expansion of any brand.

A good product is a good product, and just because Supreme only manufactures 300 when they know they can sell 400, it doesn't mean you should as well.

aeterna13.com

May 18, 2012 @ 12:39 AM
Jake Ocean

Post: 753

Join Date: Jan 2012

Location: Los Angeles

I agree with qrct1. i dont think the identity has much to do with the audience your appealing to. it does play a part, but for an example, Target, has a solid identity, and appeals to almost every human living on the earth. Thrasher has a solid identity and has a very wide and open demographic, skateboarders, skate board enthusiasts, or whatever.
if your brand your brand correctly and ensure a solid identity, you don't need to pick out precise and specific niches. it's good to have in mind a specific niche, but shouldn't appeal to them and them only

http://www.distantlight.co

May 18, 2012 @ 12:48 AM
karakter1

Post: 592

Join Date: Jun 2006

good discussion fellas....

here is my 2 cents..

there is no magic formula..."streetwear being saturated with a bunch of shitty start ups" is all subjective! EVERY BRAND, start up or not will be considered shitty to some and dope to others....the key is, finding the people that think its dope, and do your thing....i can post a bunch of "shitty" brands..then post the list of dealers full of happy customers.....

i still don't understand why some of you hate on brands that you don't like.....stop thinking your definition of streetwear and consider it more independent tee lines...then you may be able to see the limitless potential for all kinds of biz models...from majorly developed branding focused on a singular subject....to some dope random art that looks cool on a tee.

in regards to the sneakerhead audience...that shit is huge! im not even gona go into the details.....really sit back and think about that shit for a second...a billion customers, a million blogs/sneaker websites/stores worldwide....i can see that some of yall still thinking too small.
May 18, 2012 @ 12:52 AM
chads

Post: 1566

Join Date: Dec 2011

Location: Vermont

I agree with qrct1. i dont think the identity has much to do with the audience your appealing to. it does play a part, but for an example, Target, has a solid identity, and appeals to almost every human living on the earth. Thrasher has a solid identity and has a very wide and open demographic, skateboarders, skate board enthusiasts, or whatever.
if your brand your brand correctly and ensure a solid identity, you don't need to pick out precise and specific niches. it's good to have in mind a specific niche, but shouldn't appeal to them and them only

What does that have anything to do with anything to do with anything. Of course Target appeals to shitloads of people because of the low prices and easy accessibility. You don't see serious skateboarder just rolling down the street in the their Shaun White collection tee from Target, you see little 10 year olds wearing that who have single moms and look up to Shaun White and Tony Hawk. On the same note. Obviously Thrasher appeals to skateboarders and skate enthusiasts because its a skate centered magazine and skate oriented brand. Likewise you don't see little scooter kids or kids who are into racecars in a thrasher tee, they are more likely wearing something from possibly nascar or a company that makes clothes for that type of audience and interest.
Unless I misunderstood you I think that was a pretty dumb comment.

chadacadabra.tumblr.com

May 18, 2012 @ 01:27 AM
Jake Ocean

Post: 753

Join Date: Jan 2012

Location: Los Angeles

I agree with qrct1. i dont think the identity has much to do with the audience your appealing to. it does play a part, but for an example, Target, has a solid identity, and appeals to almost every human living on the earth. Thrasher has a solid identity and has a very wide and open demographic, skateboarders, skate board enthusiasts, or whatever.
if your brand your brand correctly and ensure a solid identity, you don't need to pick out precise and specific niches. it's good to have in mind a specific niche, but shouldn't appeal to them and them only

What does that have anything to do with anything to do with anything. Of course Target appeals to shitloads of people because of the low prices and easy accessibility. You don't see serious skateboarder just rolling down the street in the their Shaun White collection tee from Target, you see little 10 year olds wearing that who have single moms and look up to Shaun White and Tony Hawk. On the same note. Obviously Thrasher appeals to skateboarders and skate enthusiasts because its a skate centered magazine and skate oriented brand. Likewise you don't see little scooter kids or kids who are into racecars in a thrasher tee, they are more likely wearing something from possibly nascar or a company that makes clothes for that type of audience and interest.
Unless I misunderstood you I think that was a pretty dumb comment.


i think you misunderstoof my comment. i agree with karakter. people are thinking to small of their niches. its not like if you start up a brand and don't have a specific niche determined, like someone said the eco friendly hipsters? idk, its not like your set for failure if that isn't determined. it's good to play with your demographic, see who it is, whos buying, etc. its an ongoing thing, unless your an established brand like nike, your gonna be constantly making little changes to who your targeted audience really is. when i buy hall of fame, i dont give a fuck about their "sports theme". i buy the hat cause i like it, and it looks good. people walk into that shop on fairfax, and buy whatever they thinks looks good on them, wether they like sports or not. customers don't always look for meaning, it depends on the characteristics of the consumer. sure alot of people do care, but alot of people dont. a brand based off a general theme and aesthetics could sell like crazy if the actual products are good. meaning isn't everything in fashion; ultimately, style is what you like to and thinks looks good

http://www.distantlight.co

May 18, 2012 @ 01:31 AM
stillwild

Post: 560

Join Date: Jan 2012

Location: US

Target is totally not a comparable example because unlike most brands, they do not need to specify any "segment" or "demographic" besides pricing really. Even with grocery chains, identity places a HUGE role in market success.

Whole Foods - largely successful, highly specific natural food store

Target - bargain (average everyday family)

Trader Joes - Even more specialized, niche of carefully curated stock, housemade goods for cheap.

Even take Circuit City vs. Best Buy, Circuit City is closing down now. Why? Best Buy owns the market, because of their identity as a premier purveyor of electronic goods, whereas Circuit City never really carved out an identity, and failed. There were other factors that led to their failing, but without customer loyalty you'll never get very far.

www.stillwild.co / online store that celebrates nature!

May 18, 2012 @ 01:34 AM
stillwild

Post: 560

Join Date: Jan 2012

Location: US

I agree with qrct1. i dont think the identity has much to do with the audience your appealing to. it does play a part, but for an example, Target, has a solid identity, and appeals to almost every human living on the earth. Thrasher has a solid identity and has a very wide and open demographic, skateboarders, skate board enthusiasts, or whatever.
if your brand your brand correctly and ensure a solid identity, you don't need to pick out precise and specific niches. it's good to have in mind a specific niche, but shouldn't appeal to them and them only

What does that have anything to do with anything to do with anything. Of course Target appeals to shitloads of people because of the low prices and easy accessibility. You don't see serious skateboarder just rolling down the street in the their Shaun White collection tee from Target, you see little 10 year olds wearing that who have single moms and look up to Shaun White and Tony Hawk. On the same note. Obviously Thrasher appeals to skateboarders and skate enthusiasts because its a skate centered magazine and skate oriented brand. Likewise you don't see little scooter kids or kids who are into racecars in a thrasher tee, they are more likely wearing something from possibly nascar or a company that makes clothes for that type of audience and interest.
Unless I misunderstood you I think that was a pretty dumb comment.


i think you misunderstoof my comment. i agree with karakter. people are thinking to small of their niches. its not like if you start up a brand and don't have a specific niche determined, like someone said the eco friendly hipsters? idk, its not like your set for failure if that isn't determined. it's good to play with your demographic, see who it is, whos buying, etc. its an ongoing thing, unless your an established brand like nike, your gonna be constantly making little changes to who your targeted audience really is. when i buy hall of fame, i dont give a fuck about their "sports theme". i buy the hat cause i like it, and it looks good. people walk into that shop on fairfax, and buy whatever they thinks looks good on them, wether they like sports or not. customers don't always look for meaning, it depends on the characteristics of the consumer. sure alot of people do care, but alot of people dont. a brand based off a general theme and aesthetics could sell like crazy if the actual products are good. meaning isn't everything in fashion; ultimately, style is what you like to and thinks looks good


No, in the end, every business follows a different model that could be the formula for ruin in another business' model. But focusing on a single market allows you to allocate your resources (when you're growing, your incredibly small resources) towards consumers most likely to buy your product, which in the end should prove to be most effective for your bottom line.

www.stillwild.co / online store that celebrates nature!

May 18, 2012 @ 01:37 AM
Jake Ocean

Post: 753

Join Date: Jan 2012

Location: Los Angeles

yeah i dont really know why i used target as an example, cause it isn't really relevant since were dealing with indie brands. but yeah like i said, it's good to have one in mind, but it's always changing. i agree with what gramsonsgrams said above.

http://www.distantlight.co

May 18, 2012 @ 03:02 AM
chads

Post: 1566

Join Date: Dec 2011

Location: Vermont

yeah i dont really know why i used target as an example, cause it isn't really relevant since were dealing with indie brands. but yeah like i said, it's good to have one in mind, but it's always changing. i agree with what gramsonsgrams said above.

I think this makes the most sense to me. Some choose to have more of an identity and that is good but other don't and thats fine as well. In my opinion, I still think it is important to develop this identity as one progresses. Yes, many companies don't have to do that but at the same time it certainly can't hurt.
Also, I totally agree with your Hall of Fame comment. I personally love consistent identity in brands but I will buy a hat or shirt from Hall of Fame if I like it despite the fact that I am not a very sports oriented person.

chadacadabra.tumblr.com

May 18, 2012 @ 03:03 AM
justgrayzin

Post: 20

Join Date: Apr 2012

Location: Philly

i was wondering the best kind of shirts for sewing on, screen printing on etc...

P O $ H GANG


Please login first to reply.
Back To Top