April 2, 2012 @ 05:58 AM
hypebeast1

Post: 88

Join Date: Dec 2011


Why would your first batch be logo shirts? That doesn't make any sense.
When you are starting out, your logo means nothing to anybody but yourself.

If a new brand just started, and just made logo shirts, why the fuck would anyone buy one? When I rep a logo shirt, that's because I like the brand, I like their designs, I like what they stand for, etc.
You need to do some establishing before you just go out and make a logo shirt.

And lower quantities = higher demand is simple logic. Lower quantity, you will run out quicker.


Cannot agree more with jake on this. We started off with 4 shirts with 2 of them as our logo tees for marketing purpose without thoroughly consider that we should be concerning more with establishing the brand first b4 investing into printing logo shirts. We sold a few logo shirts here & there, but now we are focusing more on quality graphic design on each release, and will halt on the whole logo tee for awhile. This is something many newcomers tend to overlook when starting out their brand.
April 2, 2012 @ 06:16 AM
hypebeast1

Post: 88

Join Date: Dec 2011

Just curious, have anyone ordered from oversea suppliers listed on alibaba.com?

They carry many different things..from pants to jackets. Suppliers from all around the world.
Despite the high minimum in most cases, we think it would be a great source for getting blanks.
What do you think?
http://www.alibaba.com/Men-s-Clothing_pid100003070



i looked into it. it can be expensive for the good manufacturers.

a few places wanted to charge me 200-300 buck for each sample.
i ordered 2 sample hoodies from one place they where crap and small. good thing it was only 80 bucks all up.

make sure you specify what region sizing you want if you order and be very clear about details.

i would stick to blanks and print my gear on them. plus i will cost a lot to ship stuff from Chinese suppliers on alibaba.


Right. I agree getting from suppliers within the US would be a much safer route to go for. I was looking to find some blank varsity jackets and alibaba came across during my research, therefore I am wondering if anyone have tried contacting these oversea suppliers for inventories.

btw, all the supplier listed on alibaba have to go through a certified inspection approved by alibaba.com in order to be able to list themselves there.

All suppliers have this on their website:

http://static.alibaba.com/hermes/goldsuppliers.html
April 2, 2012 @ 01:42 PM
chads

Post: 1576

Join Date: Dec 2011

Location: Vermont

what sort of quantity of each product did you get for your first batch?

I....... For my first run, I'm going with 30 because I want to keep it limited so there is some demand.


This last part make no sense to me.
Lower supply equal higher demand.
I mostly only see that in the shoe industry and it only works when it is a highly sought after item. When you do that in clothing I don't see the profit or gain especially for a newly starting company.

I mean make as many as you want or however many you think you will sale.
First batch runs should in my opinion be logo shirts. Make as many of those as you can for promotion, selling, handing out on the streets, giveaway, for blogs to blast. If you want to get your name out there don't limit on the promo stuff.
Everything else after that is what your pockets can afford or whatever money is recycled from your last batch of shirt sold.

If I make a hot as shirt I'm not going to limit to hype up consumers. Supply and demand. Hot tickets bring in the extra funds. Make as many as you can if you can.
If you break even on what you spent on making the shirts and demand has gone down then give the rest away if you want with stickers and business cards.

my .02


Why would your first batch be logo shirts? That doesn't make any sense.
When you are starting out, your logo means nothing to anybody but yourself.

If a new brand just started, and just made logo shirts, why the fuck would anyone buy one? When I rep a logo shirt, that's because I like the brand, I like their designs, I like what they stand for, etc.
You need to do some establishing before you just go out and make a logo shirt.

And lower quantities = higher demand is simple logic. Lower quantity, you will run out quicker.

For my first batch of shirts I decided to only do a run of 30. Sure I have enough people that know about what I am doing that I could sell anywhere from 50 to 100 but I decided to keep it at 30 so there is some demand and some exclusivity. Part of what my brand is based on is being different and unique and if a ton of people in my general area have the same exact shirt then that ruins the purpose for me. For my first run of shirts it will be a logo shirt but my logo is also a design rather that just text in some funky font. At this point I am going one shirt at a time and have many real graphics lined up to printed and ordered when the time is right.
As for promotion, I will not be using tees as promotion but rather stickers and pins and stuff of the like. All this has been factored in to marketing.
So yes, lower supply = higher demand which is exactly what I plan to do. This whole limited vibe that is rampant throughout streetwear is just a way to trick the consumers mind. Think about how Supreme got to where it is. OF may have helped but now because of how much they produce, they have camp outs and the webstore crashing because of the demand. Now in no way am I comparing myself to Supreme, I'm just trying to get started on this process of establishing my brand and keeping a steady theme throughout.

chadacadabra.tumblr.com

April 2, 2012 @ 01:54 PM
THEDIVIDEDMINDS.COM

Post: 465

Join Date: Apr 2007

Bottoms Up MFG Initial Five Panel Camp Cap releases in five styles.

Grey colorways releasing in a couple weeks.

Spring Catalog Line Launch May 1, 2012.


Now available at:

Bottoms Up MFG Online Store




What's up bro I didn't know you had a account on here but the hats are looking good from what Hunter told me.

http://thedividedminds.com/

April 2, 2012 @ 02:27 PM
chads

Post: 1576

Join Date: Dec 2011

Location: Vermont

Sent PM, we do sourcing and manufacturing in-house.

Will you PM me info too. I might be interested.

chadacadabra.tumblr.com

April 2, 2012 @ 04:27 PM
brightfutures

Post: 94

Join Date: Dec 2008

Location: San Francisco, CA

thanks btw the leather labels look dope



Thanks, we also do label sourcing as well...

http://www.brightfuturessunglasses.com ||| INSTAGRAM: @brightfuturessunglasses

April 2, 2012 @ 05:02 PM
brightfutures

Post: 94

Join Date: Dec 2008

Location: San Francisco, CA

Bottoms Up MFG Initial Five Panel Camp Cap releases in five styles.

Grey colorways releasing in a couple weeks.

Spring Catalog Line Launch May 1, 2012.


Now available at:

Bottoms Up MFG Online Store




What's up bro I didn't know you had a account on here but the hats are looking good from what Hunter told me.



Thanks mang! Hunter needs to stop by and pick up a sample...

http://www.brightfuturessunglasses.com ||| INSTAGRAM: @brightfuturessunglasses

April 2, 2012 @ 08:05 PM
Bulldog

Post: 75

Join Date: Feb 2012

what sort of quantity of each product did you get for your first batch?

I....... For my first run, I'm going with 30 because I want to keep it limited so there is some demand.


This last part make no sense to me.
Lower supply equal higher demand.
I mostly only see that in the shoe industry and it only works when it is a highly sought after item. When you do that in clothing I don't see the profit or gain especially for a newly starting company.

I mean make as many as you want or however many you think you will sale.
First batch runs should in my opinion be logo shirts. Make as many of those as you can for promotion, selling, handing out on the streets, giveaway, for blogs to blast. If you want to get your name out there don't limit on the promo stuff.
Everything else after that is what your pockets can afford or whatever money is recycled from your last batch of shirt sold.

If I make a hot as shirt I'm not going to limit to hype up consumers. Supply and demand. Hot tickets bring in the extra funds. Make as many as you can if you can.
If you break even on what you spent on making the shirts and demand has gone down then give the rest away if you want with stickers and business cards.

my .02


Why would your first batch be logo shirts? That doesn't make any sense.
When you are starting out, your logo means nothing to anybody but yourself.

If a new brand just started, and just made logo shirts, why the fuck would anyone buy one? When I rep a logo shirt, that's because I like the brand, I like their designs, I like what they stand for, etc.
You need to do some establishing before you just go out and make a logo shirt.

And lower quantities = higher demand is simple logic. Lower quantity, you will run out quicker.

For my first batch of shirts I decided to only do a run of 30. Sure I have enough people that know about what I am doing that I could sell anywhere from 50 to 100 but I decided to keep it at 30 so there is some demand and some exclusivity. Part of what my brand is based on is being different and unique and if a ton of people in my general area have the same exact shirt then that ruins the purpose for me. For my first run of shirts it will be a logo shirt but my logo is also a design rather that just text in some funky font. At this point I am going one shirt at a time and have many real graphics lined up to printed and ordered when the time is right.
As for promotion, I will not be using tees as promotion but rather stickers and pins and stuff of the like. All this has been factored in to marketing.
So yes, lower supply = higher demand which is exactly what I plan to do. This whole limited vibe that is rampant throughout streetwear is just a way to trick the consumers mind. Think about how Supreme got to where it is. OF may have helped but now because of how much they produce, they have camp outs and the webstore crashing because of the demand. Now in no way am I comparing myself to Supreme, I'm just trying to get started on this process of establishing my brand and keeping a steady theme throughout.



A lot of good points made in this discussion. From a designer standpoint, it's my personal opinion that if an apparel company's logo isn't an image people would want to wear, that would be a sign of ineffective branding to begin with.

Pertaining to the supply and demand debate, despite the desire to keep clothing items limited or exclusive, I would say it's important to consider your budgeting as well. For the price it would cost to print up, say, 30 shirts- it could cost less than twice that to get more than double the amount of product. This in turn equates to a larger profit margin, which results in more investment capital for future ventures. If you're starting out your brand with a limited budget, it could come down to either successful product management or exclusivity to the point of bankruptcy. As rare as your product might be, are you absolutely sure an unheard-of product from a start-up brand would be something that people would pay top dollar for? Ordering product in small runs could jack the price up significantly for the customer, not to mention factoring in high shipping costs (domestic or international), taxes, etc. at the point of purchase. Unless your product is of top-notch, tailor-made quality, are you certain a customer would want to pay those premiums?

One other thing to consider with small runs is sizing.... a run of 30 shirts may sound like quite a lot of product to move, but divide that amount into sizes (S, M, L, XL, XXL, or even smaller/larger). If you have a total stock of only 30 shirts, divided by the 5 aforementioned styles, that leaves only 6 shirts per size. Even fewer if you plan to keep a couple tucked away for personal or promotional use.

As I said before, some great ideas in here. Pardon my lengthy interjection, just trying to contribute.

www.justinungar.com

April 2, 2012 @ 08:15 PM
Broken Bank Clo

Post: 536

Join Date: Apr 2009

Location: San Diego

what sort of quantity of each product did you get for your first batch?

I....... For my first run, I'm going with 30 because I want to keep it limited so there is some demand.


This last part make no sense to me.
Lower supply equal higher demand.
I mostly only see that in the shoe industry and it only works when it is a highly sought after item. When you do that in clothing I don't see the profit or gain especially for a newly starting company.

I mean make as many as you want or however many you think you will sale.
First batch runs should in my opinion be logo shirts. Make as many of those as you can for promotion, selling, handing out on the streets, giveaway, for blogs to blast. If you want to get your name out there don't limit on the promo stuff.
Everything else after that is what your pockets can afford or whatever money is recycled from your last batch of shirt sold.

If I make a hot as shirt I'm not going to limit to hype up consumers. Supply and demand. Hot tickets bring in the extra funds. Make as many as you can if you can.
If you break even on what you spent on making the shirts and demand has gone down then give the rest away if you want with stickers and business cards.

my .02


Why would your first batch be logo shirts? That doesn't make any sense.
When you are starting out, your logo means nothing to anybody but yourself.

If a new brand just started, and just made logo shirts, why the fuck would anyone buy one? When I rep a logo shirt, that's because I like the brand, I like their designs, I like what they stand for, etc.
You need to do some establishing before you just go out and make a logo shirt.

And lower quantities = higher demand is simple logic. Lower quantity, you will run out quicker.

For my first batch of shirts I decided to only do a run of 30. Sure I have enough people that know about what I am doing that I could sell anywhere from 50 to 100 but I decided to keep it at 30 so there is some demand and some exclusivity. Part of what my brand is based on is being different and unique and if a ton of people in my general area have the same exact shirt then that ruins the purpose for me. For my first run of shirts it will be a logo shirt but my logo is also a design rather that just text in some funky font. At this point I am going one shirt at a time and have many real graphics lined up to printed and ordered when the time is right.
As for promotion, I will not be using tees as promotion but rather stickers and pins and stuff of the like. All this has been factored in to marketing.
So yes, lower supply = higher demand which is exactly what I plan to do. This whole limited vibe that is rampant throughout streetwear is just a way to trick the consumers mind. Think about how Supreme got to where it is. OF may have helped but now because of how much they produce, they have camp outs and the webstore crashing because of the demand. Now in no way am I comparing myself to Supreme, I'm just trying to get started on this process of establishing my brand and keeping a steady theme throughout.


ok I kind of see what you guys are saying.
but I always had the whole perspective of branding.
Yeah a lot of companies only have font as the logo and yes that does make for a plain shirt but I see it more as advertising.
More people walking around with your logo/font people will remember the name and look it up to inquire about who this brand is.
But I guess it can go both ways. Different ways of getting the brand out there. Some ways work better for different brands.
I guess I'm looking more in the ways of the Hundreds, Fubu, POLO ect.
I hate the limited thing to be honest. Yes it will raise the value of a item but not for you but more for resellers.

So what do you guys tell customers (if you have had the problem) when they go to your website and the size they need is sold out?
Do you tell them sorry this was a limited run and we will no longer be making this shirt?
Don't you think you may lose a customer that way though.

Broken Bank Clothing *** www.BrokenBankClothing.com *** @brokenbankclo

April 2, 2012 @ 08:27 PM
Broken Bank Clo

Post: 536

Join Date: Apr 2009

Location: San Diego



A lot of good points made in this discussion. From a designer standpoint, it's my personal opinion that if an apparel company's logo isn't an image people would want to wear, that would be a sign of ineffective branding to begin with.

Pertaining to the supply and demand debate, despite the desire to keep clothing items limited or exclusive, I would say it's important to consider your budgeting as well. For the price it would cost to print up, say, 30 shirts- it could cost less than twice that to get more than double the amount of product. This in turn equates to a larger profit margin, which results in more investment capital for future ventures. If you're starting out your brand with a limited budget, it could come down to either successful product management or exclusivity to the point of bankruptcy. As rare as your product might be, are you absolutely sure an unheard-of product from a start-up brand would be something that people would pay top dollar for? Ordering product in small runs could jack the price up significantly for the customer, not to mention factoring in high shipping costs (domestic or international), taxes, etc. at the point of purchase. Unless your product is of top-notch, tailor-made quality, are you certain a customer would want to pay those premiums?

One other thing to consider with small runs is sizing.... a run of 30 shirts may sound like quite a lot of product to move, but divide that amount into sizes (S, M, L, XL, XXL, or even smaller/larger). If you have a total stock of only 30 shirts, divided by the 5 aforementioned styles, that leaves only 6 shirts per size. Even fewer if you plan to keep a couple tucked away for personal or promotional use.

As I said before, some great ideas in here. Pardon my lengthy interjection, just trying to contribute.


Not to mention when you do 2 shirt colors as well.
I just did a run of 36 shirts I'm having printed. 18 black and 18 grey. 4 of s-xl and 2 2xl. I'm not having customer ask me if I can make the shirt for them in a larger size 4xl. I thought to myself damn now I have to cater to big people who want my shirt lol. But if I tell them no sorry these are limited I just lost money and a customer. Now i have a unpleased customer and will not refer his friends, probably talk bad about the brand. That may also leave the door open for copy cat designers.
Just something I think about. As a new brand I do to a certain extent want to cater to build clientele. Then once I got them hooked then start doing limited stuff.

Broken Bank Clothing *** www.BrokenBankClothing.com *** @brokenbankclo

April 2, 2012 @ 08:36 PM
aces1

Post: 85

Join Date: Dec 2008

those panels look clean, good work
April 2, 2012 @ 08:45 PM
chads

Post: 1576

Join Date: Dec 2011

Location: Vermont

what sort of quantity of each product did you get for your first batch?

I....... For my first run, I'm going with 30 because I want to keep it limited so there is some demand.


This last part make no sense to me.
Lower supply equal higher demand.
I mostly only see that in the shoe industry and it only works when it is a highly sought after item. When you do that in clothing I don't see the profit or gain especially for a newly starting company.

I mean make as many as you want or however many you think you will sale.
First batch runs should in my opinion be logo shirts. Make as many of those as you can for promotion, selling, handing out on the streets, giveaway, for blogs to blast. If you want to get your name out there don't limit on the promo stuff.
Everything else after that is what your pockets can afford or whatever money is recycled from your last batch of shirt sold.

If I make a hot as shirt I'm not going to limit to hype up consumers. Supply and demand. Hot tickets bring in the extra funds. Make as many as you can if you can.
If you break even on what you spent on making the shirts and demand has gone down then give the rest away if you want with stickers and business cards.

my .02


Why would your first batch be logo shirts? That doesn't make any sense.
When you are starting out, your logo means nothing to anybody but yourself.

If a new brand just started, and just made logo shirts, why the fuck would anyone buy one? When I rep a logo shirt, that's because I like the brand, I like their designs, I like what they stand for, etc.
You need to do some establishing before you just go out and make a logo shirt.

And lower quantities = higher demand is simple logic. Lower quantity, you will run out quicker.

For my first batch of shirts I decided to only do a run of 30. Sure I have enough people that know about what I am doing that I could sell anywhere from 50 to 100 but I decided to keep it at 30 so there is some demand and some exclusivity. Part of what my brand is based on is being different and unique and if a ton of people in my general area have the same exact shirt then that ruins the purpose for me. For my first run of shirts it will be a logo shirt but my logo is also a design rather that just text in some funky font. At this point I am going one shirt at a time and have many real graphics lined up to printed and ordered when the time is right.
As for promotion, I will not be using tees as promotion but rather stickers and pins and stuff of the like. All this has been factored in to marketing.
So yes, lower supply = higher demand which is exactly what I plan to do. This whole limited vibe that is rampant throughout streetwear is just a way to trick the consumers mind. Think about how Supreme got to where it is. OF may have helped but now because of how much they produce, they have camp outs and the webstore crashing because of the demand. Now in no way am I comparing myself to Supreme, I'm just trying to get started on this process of establishing my brand and keeping a steady theme throughout.



A lot of good points made in this discussion. From a designer standpoint, it's my personal opinion that if an apparel company's logo isn't an image people would want to wear, that would be a sign of ineffective branding to begin with.

Pertaining to the supply and demand debate, despite the desire to keep clothing items limited or exclusive, I would say it's important to consider your budgeting as well. For the price it would cost to print up, say, 30 shirts- it could cost less than twice that to get more than double the amount of product. This in turn equates to a larger profit margin, which results in more investment capital for future ventures. If you're starting out your brand with a limited budget, it could come down to either successful product management or exclusivity to the point of bankruptcy. As rare as your product might be, are you absolutely sure an unheard-of product from a start-up brand would be something that people would pay top dollar for? Ordering product in small runs could jack the price up significantly for the customer, not to mention factoring in high shipping costs (domestic or international), taxes, etc. at the point of purchase. Unless your product is of top-notch, tailor-made quality, are you certain a customer would want to pay those premiums?

One other thing to consider with small runs is sizing.... a run of 30 shirts may sound like quite a lot of product to move, but divide that amount into sizes (S, M, L, XL, XXL, or even smaller/larger). If you have a total stock of only 30 shirts, divided by the 5 aforementioned styles, that leaves only 6 shirts per size. Even fewer if you plan to keep a couple tucked away for personal or promotional use.

As I said before, some great ideas in here. Pardon my lengthy interjection, just trying to contribute.

I see what you are saying about smaller runs equaling smaller profit margin but for me that is not a problem. I have done enough research at this point that my small run is really no problem. Granted, after I sell all my shirts, I will really only have made about $400 but I will only be charging $20 to $24 per shirt. This is something I don't have to worry about nearly as much as some of the other people on here because I'm only 16 so I'm still living under my parents roof and eating their food. I choose to do this and start so early so I can truly have time to establish myself so when I actually have to rely on any income of my own, I can afford it. By no means do I plan to have such small runs that my store crashes for every drop and sells out in five minutes but I want to be comfortably living and making sure that my fans have the ability to cop what they want. I truly would rather make a larger run than see a simple t shirt up on ebay for $100.
I'm really just saying that your points are very valid and pertain to many who are trying to start in this business but at the same time, this topic doesn't concern me nearly as much as it may for others.

chadacadabra.tumblr.com

April 2, 2012 @ 08:53 PM
Bulldog

Post: 75

Join Date: Feb 2012


I see what you are saying about smaller runs equaling smaller profit margin but for me that is not a problem. I have done enough research at this point that my small run is really no problem. Granted, after I sell all my shirts, I will really only have made about $400 but I will only be charging $20 to $24 per shirt. This is something I don't have to worry about nearly as much as some of the other people on here because I'm only 16 so I'm still living under my parents roof and eating their food. I choose to do this and start so early so I can truly have time to establish myself so when I actually have to rely on any income of my own, I can afford it. By no means do I plan to have such small runs that my store crashes for every drop and sells out in five minutes but I want to be comfortably living and making sure that my fans have the ability to cop what they want. I truly would rather make a larger run than see a simple t shirt up on ebay for $100.
I'm really just saying that your points are very valid and pertain to many who are trying to start in this business but at the same time, this topic doesn't concern me nearly as much as it may for others.


Absolutely, everyone's circumstances and budgets are different. I wasn't directing my post at you or anyone in particular, just piggy-backing off the most recent post pertaining to the discussion.

www.justinungar.com

April 2, 2012 @ 09:10 PM
samweinberg

Post: 37

Join Date: Mar 2012

Location: Los Angeles

what sort of quantity of each product did you get for your first batch?

I....... For my first run, I'm going with 30 because I want to keep it limited so there is some demand.


This last part make no sense to me.
Lower supply equal higher demand.
I mostly only see that in the shoe industry and it only works when it is a highly sought after item. When you do that in clothing I don't see the profit or gain especially for a newly starting company.

I mean make as many as you want or however many you think you will sale.
First batch runs should in my opinion be logo shirts. Make as many of those as you can for promotion, selling, handing out on the streets, giveaway, for blogs to blast. If you want to get your name out there don't limit on the promo stuff.
Everything else after that is what your pockets can afford or whatever money is recycled from your last batch of shirt sold.

If I make a hot as shirt I'm not going to limit to hype up consumers. Supply and demand. Hot tickets bring in the extra funds. Make as many as you can if you can.
If you break even on what you spent on making the shirts and demand has gone down then give the rest away if you want with stickers and business cards.

my .02


Why would your first batch be logo shirts? That doesn't make any sense.
When you are starting out, your logo means nothing to anybody but yourself.

If a new brand just started, and just made logo shirts, why the fuck would anyone buy one? When I rep a logo shirt, that's because I like the brand, I like their designs, I like what they stand for, etc.
You need to do some establishing before you just go out and make a logo shirt.

And lower quantities = higher demand is simple logic. Lower quantity, you will run out quicker.


word.

City Limits - Fall 2012

April 2, 2012 @ 09:28 PM
brightfutures

Post: 94

Join Date: Dec 2008

Location: San Francisco, CA

those panels look clean, good work


Thanks Eric.

http://www.brightfuturessunglasses.com ||| INSTAGRAM: @brightfuturessunglasses

April 3, 2012 @ 03:09 AM
slvtlife

Post: 34

Join Date: Feb 2012

Location: Hong Kong

woo I love how these past few posts are really getting into the knit work of starting up a brand. Comments & crits of designs are fine and dandy, but the logistics and supply management aspect are equally just as important for a new brand.

the words of LaMash are gold (btw, I got your awesome sauce stickers man! Thanks!), but to follow up on the concept of exclusive quantities by controlling how many products you produce on the get go as a start up brand? That's a stupid idea in my opinion. Unless you've got some serious name to yourself or you have someone famous who'll really stick out and promote it for you, the limited runs for most people will be a wasted effort, and might actually hurt you mentally if you're running the exclusive track and no one buys your swag. Limiting a run only will work well when people actually desire the product. Just like the comment of the poster who mentioned that he'd only wear a logo shirt because of what it represents to themselves and how established a brand it were. If you could use the term "selling yourself out" as most people understand it, this is what essentially you should be doing at this point in the game. Marketing it to as many people within your niche is what you really should be aiming for, because getting your name out there is number 1. Celebrities are no different, if they want fame, they appear everywhere and anywhere that matters. Running a brand in that regard is no different in my eyes, but if course it's no easy task to accomplish, when you're already running production, design & marketing.

Creative/Founder www.slvtlife.com / www.facebook.com/slvtlife

April 3, 2012 @ 03:22 AM
deathcats

Post: 12

Join Date: Mar 2012

Location: Houston, Texas

thanks btw the leather labels look dope



Thanks, we also do label sourcing as well...


Pm'd!
April 4, 2012 @ 12:38 AM
stillwild

Post: 597

Join Date: Jan 2012

Location: US

In regards to the discussion about limiting runs, I'd like to throw my .02 in. It can be a double-edged sword, I feel. In reducing your profits through a smaller sized run, you're already hurting yourself as a small start-up, reducing the overall amount of return you'll be able to see. Investing in a run, small or large is a big investment, and shouldn't be taken lightly. With that said, it can be an extremely poignant marketing strategy, and in my eyes, the only way to build the credibility to eventually garner a supreme-esque following in terms of demand, and enjoy all of it's benefits (pricing advantages, a community of vested consumers, etc.) Sporadic and inconsistent limitedness without a purpose? I frown upon that.

www.stillwild.co / online store that celebrates nature!

April 4, 2012 @ 02:35 AM
karakter1

Post: 592

Join Date: Jun 2006

guys...dont worry too much bout size run in terms of being "limited"

i promise, that whether you print 10 of a style ..or 100 of a style...it will be extremely limited in comparison to an established brand!
April 4, 2012 @ 02:46 AM
T.E.I.N.

Post: 23

Join Date: Jan 2012

Location: Pittsburgh

Bottoms Up MFG Initial Five Panel Camp Cap releases in five styles.

Grey colorways releasing in a couple weeks.

Spring Catalog Line Launch May 1, 2012.


Now available at:

Bottoms Up MFG Online Store




Yo this is mad dope...how do you print on your leather labels though
April 4, 2012 @ 02:46 AM
karakter1

Post: 592

Join Date: Jun 2006



in terms of logo shirts......

here are a few ways to increase brand awareness without making a simple logo tee..

1. include your brand name within the design.....2. simply add your logo to the design.

here is an example of both in one tee!
April 4, 2012 @ 02:57 AM
karakter1

Post: 592

Join Date: Jun 2006

and to respond to chad ..who earlier said that OF may have helped Supreme.....it was the other way around! He knew what he was doing by putting that hat on.
April 4, 2012 @ 02:57 AM
Dare.

Post: 130

Join Date: Mar 2012

Location: NYC

Well like everyone in this thread I want to start a clothing line. Problem is out of all of my friends none of them share an interest in graphic design as I do. They said they would support me through the judging of a design and promotion process but none of them can help me in the actual design process. So what am I left to do?

Other than the design aspect as far as logos and graphic tee's go i also have many ideas as far as clothing in general goes. I'm pretty sure they would be innovative and change the game up a bit but like i said who am I to go to, to work on projects and shi* while i work my way to producing the actual product. Not sure if my ideas have been done but i've yet to see them done. There could always be some underground brand who has done it but i haven't seen it yet.

?

April 4, 2012 @ 02:59 AM
karakter1

Post: 592

Join Date: Jun 2006

We just dropped a crewneck...


dopeness!!
April 4, 2012 @ 04:03 AM
Jake Ocean

Post: 752

Join Date: Jan 2012

Location: Los Angeles

yeah Supreme would have been doing just as fine with out Odd Future, the only difference is that Supreme wouldn't have annoying dick riding fans that like Supreme cause odd future does.

http://www.distantlight.co

April 4, 2012 @ 04:13 AM
stillwild

Post: 597

Join Date: Jan 2012

Location: US



When in Spring 2012 are you thinkin about droppin distant light?

www.stillwild.co / online store that celebrates nature!

April 4, 2012 @ 04:19 AM
stillwild

Post: 597

Join Date: Jan 2012

Location: US

Well like everyone in this thread I want to start a clothing line. Problem is out of all of my friends none of them share an interest in graphic design as I do. They said they would support me through the judging of a design and promotion process but none of them can help me in the actual design process. So what am I left to do?

Other than the design aspect as far as logos and graphic tee's go i also have many ideas as far as clothing in general goes. I'm pretty sure they would be innovative and change the game up a bit but like i said who am I to go to, to work on projects and shi* while i work my way to producing the actual product. Not sure if my ideas have been done but i've yet to see them done. There could always be some underground brand who has done it but i haven't seen it yet.


Well it seems you've two routes.
1. The D.I.Y route, cheaper for sure. Open some tutorials, and start crankin out some designs for a logo, (or a brand name if you haven't gotten that far) and refine until you've got something provocative, simplistic enough to change for use in a number of mediums (designs + advertising, etc..), and that YOU'RE generally happy with (if it's truly aesthetically pleasing and readable, consumers will come..). Be ready to really focus on that revision process, a problem I have (and a number of other small business owners too more than likely, especially in a lone ranger operations) is that it's just me. The ideas + concepts, all that are generated from me, so there's no true perspective really (meaning shit can be whack, but your too close to smell it, in other words).

2. Hire a graphic designer, work with him/her to revise until your happy, pay some scratch.

Good luck mate.

www.stillwild.co / online store that celebrates nature!

April 4, 2012 @ 04:47 AM
Jake Ocean

Post: 752

Join Date: Jan 2012

Location: Los Angeles



When in Spring 2012 are you thinkin about droppin distant light?


late april - early may!

http://www.distantlight.co

April 4, 2012 @ 05:24 AM
Jake Ocean

Post: 752

Join Date: Jan 2012

Location: Los Angeles

Got these buttons in as well.

http://www.distantlight.co

April 4, 2012 @ 05:35 AM
rickylgnds

Post: 35

Join Date: Jan 2012

Location: Canada

haven't posted in a minute...here's what we've been up to! just finished a quick lookbook over the weekend, very satisfied with the turnout...a couple of the pics:







the full lookbook is available here: http://shoplgnds.com/lookbook/ ...i know the kid looks 15 (cause he's not much older) but he's a very talented local skater so i decided to use him for this shoot

just dropped our LOGO tees tonight too



as for the discussion about logo tees and limited runs....i dont see the harm in starting with a small run of logo tees, you'll probably be able to get them out to your friends at the very least and start exposing it...and dont try to kid yourself and say you are printing 25-50 shirts because it's a "limited run"....it's because you know you can't sell more than that, if even that, and it's all you can afford. we're all in the same boat! start small and grow!

www.shoplgnds.com | LGNDS NEVER DIE!


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