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September 12, 2012 @ 02:04 AM
Bulldog

Post: 75

Join Date: Feb 2012

If I may address the debate regarding originality...

Statistically, the likelihood of a small, home-based start-up clothing brand turning the collective streetwear scene towards a completely new trend is high unlikely. Can it happen? Absolutely, albeit rare. However, a brand does not need to revolutionize the industry to become successful. Originality itself can be viewed subjectively, and it certainly does not equal success. To be quite honest, originality in terms of trends is not even necessary for a brand to stay afloat. The cycle of trends dictate the direction of the fashion industry as a whole. This is a given. What it comes down to is, in my opinion, whether or not a brand reacts to trends in a tasteful way. For instance, the Native American-inspired pattern trend which surfaced a bit ago has been prevalent throughout recent seasons' collections and continues to be so for the immediate upcoming season as well. Some brands react to this trend by creating a homogenous, shallow nod towards the theme, born from the perceived obligation to absorb any and all fads which may spring up. I would consider this distasteful.... no brand should ever undertake an endeavor halfheartedly. Yet there are those who address such a fad in a manner that the brand's offering does not merely bow to the trend; rather, the trend itself becomes infused into their own personal style. Consider Benny Gold's Valencia Collection for one. Rather than throw up a bland rendition of a Navajo print shirt, Benny cleverly plays off the pattern and works it into his iconic paper airplane logo. That twist is what correlates to successful design, and in turn, a successful brand.

www.justinungar.com

September 12, 2012 @ 02:08 AM
lightworks1crew

Post: 41

Join Date: Aug 2012

Location: PA

@lamash Nailed it

THE NAME OF THE GAME / www.lightworksclothing.com

September 12, 2012 @ 02:12 AM
rare01

Post: 90

Join Date: Jul 2012

I've gotten advice from many different successful brand owners, and they tell me many things i should avoid, and do. but one thing that they all say, that they never leave out, is ALWAYS be original. Did Huf become the brand they are today from stealing the box logo from supreme? Did stussy become the brand they are today from stealing the color schemes from obey? I haven't seen a brand who became successful from ripping off others ideas, so what's makes you think stealing other brands ideas will make YOU successful. These brands became successful for being unique and different, stussy for bringing a surfer/skater apparel, supreme for bringing in patterned hats, obey for bringing in street art and protest related issues. And especially johnny cupcakes, they sold their merchandise from suitcases, during shows. i mean how original is that. Originality is key in having a brand. Johnny once said, "If you're original, you'll never have competition."


well said --



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September 12, 2012 @ 02:24 AM
stillwild

Post: 560

Join Date: Jan 2012

Location: US

I've gotten advice from many different successful brand owners, and they tell me many things i should avoid, and do. but one thing that they all say, that they never leave out, is ALWAYS be original. Did Huf become the brand they are today from stealing the box logo from supreme? Did stussy become the brand they are today from stealing the color schemes from obey? I haven't seen a brand who became successful from ripping off others ideas, so what's makes you think stealing other brands ideas will make YOU successful. These brands became successful for being unique and different, stussy for bringing a surfer/skater apparel, supreme for bringing in patterned hats, obey for bringing in street art and protest related issues. And especially johnny cupcakes, they sold their merchandise from suitcases, during shows. i mean how original is that. Originality is key in having a brand. Johnny once said, "If you're original, you'll never have competition."


well said --



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You're a joke.
This is the same thing I've been saying, literally.

I cannot stop laughing hahahaha.

www.stillwild.co / online store that celebrates nature!

September 12, 2012 @ 02:26 AM
ricosway

Post: 52

Join Date: Apr 2012

@aldenteco

really?
after all that, and then the lull of non-talking?
you decide to start posting again?
and it's equally ignorant.

this all started because you can't take constructive criticism.

Lol the funny thing about that hippy kid, is he's saying something to the notion
I can't believe anyone in this thread has the nerve to call me immature and question my morals.

"brands are following trends and doing what others do, which isn't part of being successful. yea you'll probably sell out in clothes, but really you're just selling out. cause what's a brand with no originality?"

I pray you listen to this "kid".

I pray you step up your game, and you as well @ricosway.

When I drop my shit, I hope you're both willing to admit -- I'm Kobe and you're Linsanity, that shit don't last.


What's funny is you're telling me to step up my game but you haven't experienced a percentage of the success I have. Instead of hating, grind! The reason why I didn't entertain that Hippy guy is because he has the same mind state as you. People love to talk about Supreme and the red box but I bet you both didn't know Nike was the first to start the red box with the white font, you fools.

I don't think of anyone else when we're making our designs, everything comes from my ideas. If my design reflects something I was inspired by then so be it. Who are you to tell me what to design? I respect constructive criticism but what you're doing is hating. What makes it annoying is the fact that you've experienced NO SUCCESS, you don't have nothing to show for this BRAND you're talking about.

Just shut up and do your own thing stop worrying about the next man. You guys literally want to see someone's brand not succeed because you can't get your brand off of the ground? That saids enough about your character.

I wish you well.
September 12, 2012 @ 02:30 AM
stillwild

Post: 560

Join Date: Jan 2012

Location: US

Consider Benny Gold's Valencia Collection for one. Rather than throw up a bland rendition of a Navajo print shirt, Benny cleverly plays off the pattern and works it into his iconic paper airplane logo. That twist is what correlates to successful design, and in turn, a successful brand.


There's no debating Benny's design skills, but...

Biased. If you're gonna be critical, be critical.

Benny's navajo pattern is the same as everyone else's basically.
His brand was already hyped and already successful.

Like karakter said awhile back, some people like him (and there are a lot out there), will buy ________ just because they're ____________.

Benny's valencia collection was by far his most disappointing (the only anything from I didn't buy anything from since I found out about B.G.).

AND NOT ONLY, did he sell out from making a whole collection based on this trend, HE SOLD OUT BY MAKING A REPRINT.

It disgusts me a bit that out of all of his designs, the one collection he reprints for is the most far from what his brand is.

Yes, it's essentially a brand about youth and design.

But what got me was B.G. even though they used the staple graphic t-shirt, etc. like everyone else -- it was always based around Benny's unique designs. For instance the "Works for Jerks" tee, how classic is that? Totally fits with his mantra.

This? Mainstreaming sellout goodness at it's best.

www.stillwild.co / online store that celebrates nature!

September 12, 2012 @ 02:40 AM
stillwild

Post: 560

Join Date: Jan 2012

Location: US

@ricosway:

You have all these followers.
I'd be curious to know what percentage actually engages with you, and your comments.
From your twitter, it appears that about 1:8 is a mention from a customer, and the others are posts by you.
Yeah dude, success.
Same thing as your tumblr.

Sure, you have people "following" your "movement".

My success, it'll be dictated by the quality of what I put out, and the people who support it.

Quality over quantity.

Oh and by the way, creativity or inspiration is not completely ripping off something.

The raptors logo with "SNDVL", really? Like really?
A bulls logo with a caption? REALLY.

Someone worked hard on both those logos and you've essentially copy and pasted them, yeah dude, worked real hard.

STEP YOUR GAME UP.

www.stillwild.co / online store that celebrates nature!

September 12, 2012 @ 02:46 AM
Ian x illany

Post: 91

Join Date: Feb 2012

Location: NY

hahaha stillwild is going off on anyone who types anything right now

ILLANY! ~ @illanewyork ~ www.illanewyork.tumblr.com/

September 12, 2012 @ 02:54 AM
ricosway

Post: 52

Join Date: Apr 2012

@ricosway:

You have all these followers.
I'd be curious to know what percentage actually engages with you, and your comments.
From your twitter, it appears that about 1:8 is a mention from a customer, and the others are posts by you.
Yeah dude, success.
Same thing as your tumblr.

Sure, you have people "following" your "movement".

My success, it'll be dictated by the quality of what I put out, and the people who support it.

Quality over quantity.

Oh and by the way, creativity or inspiration is not completely ripping off something.

The raptors logo with "SNDVL", really? Like really?
A bulls logo with a caption? REALLY.

Someone worked hard on both those logos and you've essentially copy and pasted them, yeah dude, worked real hard.

STEP YOUR GAME UP.


Lmao, look at the average amount of "comments" we receive on our pictures on Instagram not even likes lol. That should tell you enough. This is where you're confused, unless you're huge you're not going to get customers comments on Twitter all day. Like I said I'm a new brand so majority of my tweets are sneaker based, basically conversations with other sneakerheads and customers every now and then. Majority of my business comes from Instagram because that's where we started and gained a lot of our popularity. I never focused on twitter, followers just flowed in and we're only following 200+ with 3000+ followers. As far as Tumblr and Facebook those are social networks we just signed up for, I don't really focus on the two but without no effort we're still at 200+ followers on Tumblr and 600+ on Facebook. The funny part about it is we just launched this year so what are you saying? You have 29 followers man, 29!!! Haha!!! No one cares about your brand but you. Forget, all of the followers I have and people that support me. I've provided the proof that my brand is doing well, I posted a picture earlier with my shipments and that's on average. Please take your own advice, I'm always stepping my game up that's what a business is about, evolving and you should do the same.

I can't even critique your brand because it's NOTHING, literally NOTHING to critique. You have nothing but a name lol, like really nothing? And you have the nerve to tell me to step up my game lol. You're a joke!

Post some of your designs, give us something other than a green background on your website to critique haha.
September 12, 2012 @ 02:56 AM
Bulldog

Post: 75

Join Date: Feb 2012

Consider Benny Gold's Valencia Collection for one. Rather than throw up a bland rendition of a Navajo print shirt, Benny cleverly plays off the pattern and works it into his iconic paper airplane logo. That twist is what correlates to successful design, and in turn, a successful brand.


Biased. If you're gonna be critical, be critical.

Benny's navajo pattern is the same as everyone else's basically.
His brand was already hyped and already successful.

Like karakter said awhile back, some people like him (and there are a lot out there), will buy ________ just because they're ____________.

Benny's valencia collection was by far his most disappointing (the only anything from I didn't buy anything from since I found out about B.G.).

AND NOT ONLY, did he sell out from making a whole collection based on this trend, HE SOLD OUT BY MAKING A REPRINT.

It disgusts me a bit that out of all of his designs, the one collection he reprints for is the most far from what his brand is.

Yes, it's essentially a brand about youth and design.

But what got me was B.G. even though they used the staple graphic t-shirt, etc. like everyone else -- it was always based around Benny's unique designs. For instance the "Works for Jerks" tee, how classic is that? Totally fits with his mantra.

This? Mainstreaming sellout goodness at it's best.


I am far from biased in this matter, nor have I yet to purchase a single Benny Gold product to this date. I do, however, regard him as a well-respected designer and visionary from his past and present work in both the apparel and graphic fields. His concept of identity is superb, take a look at the strong foundation he created for both HUF and his own brand.

The Valencia Collection that Benny released included a number of other items completely unrelated to the Navajo print trend, including unstructured ball caps and pyramid apparel, to name a few. Yet I commend him for his undertaking in regards to said Navajo-patterned trend because he pushed it above and beyond what other brands demonstrated. The packaging for the Native print socks was specifically designed to be removed and folded into a papercraft teepee. That alone demonstrates not only a mastery of one's craft as an apparel and product designer, but experience in addressing preexisting trends in an individual and innovative manner. In regards to the restock in question, there was only one set of items reprinted- the 5 panels which bore the same woven Benny Gold tag as seen on previously-produced items for at least the past year. Not to mention these items were also released alongside other items bearing the traditional BG look which you have advocated, such as the collaborative items with Mighty Healthy.

As I stated previously, the concept of originality itself is subjective. To convey a preexisting idea in a way that no one has yet seen or been able to duplicate; that, in my opinion, falls under the category of originality.

www.justinungar.com

September 12, 2012 @ 02:58 AM
rare01

Post: 90

Join Date: Jul 2012

Your face is a joke. Oops,sorry I meant your logo


this looks like scrambled letters gone wrong
I am not an amazing artist but what the fuck did you make your graphics and layouts with, ms paint ?
Seriously, look at your stuff before you start criticizing other brands
you are a fucking hater, your site is wack, your graphics are horrible and sounds like a whiny little bitch that goes off about creating the biggest drop but never delivers, stop the fuckin trash talkin and let your work speak.

*** I seriously look forward to you new brand *** hopefully it's not made with paint


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September 12, 2012 @ 03:03 AM
stillwild

Post: 560

Join Date: Jan 2012

Location: US

Your face is a joke.


I can't in good conscience, being of age to join the army, answer a post that starts with this.

I'm not a child, contrary to popular belief. I won't resort to name calling.

I mean, really, my face is a joke?

www.stillwild.co / online store that celebrates nature!

September 12, 2012 @ 03:04 AM
ricosway

Post: 52

Join Date: Apr 2012

Your face is a joke. Oops,sorry I meant your logo


this looks like scrambled letters gone wrong
I am not an amazing artist but what the fuck did you make your graphics and layouts with, ms paint ?
Seriously, look at your stuff before you start criticizing other brands
you are a fucking hater, your site is wack, your graphics are horrible, and sounds like a whiny little bitch that goes off about creating the biggest drop but never delivers, stop the fuckin trash talkin and let your work speak.



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Nah @rare01, these are not designs from the guy we're arguing with right now. I'm literally over here laughing my dude, I wouldn't know if I should wear his shirt or try to play scrabble. LMAO @ designing on MS PAINT… I'm done fam hahaha!!! I can't get over that face logo, I'm laughing so hard right now.

I'm done @stillwild anything you say from this point is null and void.

Good luck with your brand haha
September 12, 2012 @ 03:09 AM
stillwild

Post: 560

Join Date: Jan 2012

Location: US

@lamash

I know that it was just the hat.
The hat was the least original piece and the least creative.

From a business standpoint, the restock makes perfect sense, but from a consumer standpoint?
It's like if Supreme reprinted something from their first collection, the brand couldn't help but be tarnished -- same with B.G. up until this point, they've worked under the same exclusivity model as Supreme, but all of a sudden it's okay for them to change their model just because of a demand?

Supreme has plenty of demand, they certainly wouldn't buckle, not only because it's been years and it would do noticeable damage to their rep, but people would hate on them for ABANDONING THEIR promise.

What more does a brand have to accomplish than to adhere to it's brand promise? I think worked out ok, 'cause B.G. wasn't all about exclusivity, it was just a component, but still, sell-out.

www.stillwild.co / online store that celebrates nature!

September 12, 2012 @ 03:14 AM
stillwild

Post: 560

Join Date: Jan 2012

Location: US

@ricosway

Everyone's gotta start somewhere.
I started there, and like I said, now I'm here.

I would think you would realize this, considering your opening spiel with your life story about making it from grad to "movement" (which makes me question the sincerity of it, but anyway).

I never claimed to be an artist? (C'mon this ignorance shit is getting stupid).

However, from my logo to my designs (yes, I paid someone else to do the designs which I am claiming are > than your shit).

But, owning a business means knowing your strengths and weaknesses, especially if you're a one-man show.

I'm not graphically skilled, I never claimed that.

What I did claim, is my designs are better than yours, and they are.

Conceptually, artistically, enjoy running your copy of www.fullylaced.com, you joke.

And here -- is far, far ahead of wherever it is your brands are.

(At least the face logo is something I can claim to have made 100% rather than putting out clothing that is only 5% mine.... and more than likely infringing on a trademark...)



But this is original too right?

www.stillwild.co / online store that celebrates nature!

September 12, 2012 @ 03:16 AM
Frank_

Post: 1206

Join Date: Jan 2009

beside all the arguing .....i just looked at the box we have left of shirts...and we only have about 20 or left sooo
September 12, 2012 @ 03:19 AM
stillwild

Post: 560

Join Date: Jan 2012

Location: US

beside all the arguing .....i just looked at the box we have left of shirts...and we only have about 20 or left sooo


Is your logo hand drawn?

www.stillwild.co / online store that celebrates nature!

September 12, 2012 @ 03:20 AM
rare01

Post: 90

Join Date: Jul 2012

@stillwild --- Out of all the things I've said, that caught your eye.
Chillax,it was a JOKE buddy. har,ha.

seriously though, why don't you quote on this

"you are a fucking hater, your site is wack, your graphics are horrible, and sounds like a whiny little bitch that goes off about creating the biggest drop but never delivers, stop the fuckin trash talkin and let your work speak"
September 12, 2012 @ 03:22 AM
Frank_

Post: 1206

Join Date: Jan 2009

@stillwild the thing in the corner nah not hand drawn.... that pic is old as shit and i just been to lazy to take the originals off a cd
September 12, 2012 @ 03:24 AM
Jake Ocean

Post: 752

Join Date: Jan 2012

Location: Los Angeles

I disagree that Benny sold out by restocking the 5 panel caps. From a consumer standpoint, they are rad and super wearable. From a design standpoint, he took his authentic label, patched it on a 5 panel, and came up with a creative pattern based off the navajo pattern.
I see creativity in that.

I don't see any other brands putting out hand soap, candles, yoyo's, camera straps, and iphone backs.
he said himself that the 5 panel was his most popular product, and sold out in a very short amount of time. a restock is selling out? with his inspirational blog, instagram, and twitter being updated hourly, i simply don't see that.

http://www.distantlight.co

September 12, 2012 @ 03:28 AM
ricosway

Post: 52

Join Date: Apr 2012

@ricosway

Everyone's gotta start somewhere.
I started there, and like I said, now I'm here.

I would think you would realize this, considering your opening spiel with your life story about making it from grad to "movement" (which makes me question the sincerity of it, but anyway).

I never claimed to be an artist? (C'mon this ignorance shit is getting stupid).

However, from my logo to my designs (yes, I paid someone else to do the designs which I am claiming are > than your shit).

But, owning a business means knowing your strengths and weaknesses, especially if you're a one-man show.

I'm not graphically skilled, I never claimed that.

What I did claim, is my designs are better than yours, and they are.

Conceptually, artistically, enjoy running your copy of www.fullylaced.com, you joke.

And here -- is far, far ahead of wherever it is your brands are.

(At least the face logo is something I can claim to have made 100% rather than putting out clothing that is only 5% mine.... and more than likely infringing on a trademark...)



But this is original too right?


Your opinion is null and void after seeing your website and designs

Haha @ saying you started out there and now you're here. You haven't went anywhere, fool! Your brand is still the trash you started off with hahaha!

Good luck with your brand haha
September 12, 2012 @ 03:33 AM
Bulldog

Post: 75

Join Date: Feb 2012

@lamash

I know that it was just the hat.
The hat was the least original piece and the least creative.

From a business standpoint, the restock makes perfect sense, but from a consumer standpoint?
It's like if Supreme reprinted something from their first collection, the brand couldn't help but be tarnished -- same with B.G. up until this point, they've worked under the same exclusivity model as Supreme, but all of a sudden it's okay for them to change their model just because of a demand?

Supreme has plenty of demand, they certainly wouldn't buckle, not only because it's been years and it would do noticeable damage to their rep, but people would hate on them for ABANDONING THEIR promise.

What more does a brand have to accomplish than to adhere to it's brand promise? I think worked out ok, 'cause B.G. wasn't all about exclusivity, it was just a component, but still, sell-out.


I don't believe one can compare Supreme and BG. They operate under two completely different philosophies and business models. Supreme is a faceless entity, with no real one-on-one customer relationship. Benny Gold, however, is a brand built by and named after one man. BG's manner of business involves forming and maintaining relationships on a personal level with consumers, supporters, and fellow brands alike. If loyal people with whom he interacts with on both a regular and business basis express their dismay for missing out on something he himself created, I don't blame the man for listening. He states on his blog, "a lot of our key store accounts and customers missed out on them so we re-ran a VERY LIMITED amount." This means the small restock fulfills demand on the behalf of both contracted vendors and an integral client base. Rather than "selling out," I see it as more of an olive branch extended to disappointed fans and suppliers alike who had the misfortune of missing out on the release. Not to mention he's one man with a personally-run retail space and people on the payroll, along with a new family. I don't feel his creativity has been hindered a bit by the need to operate his business in a practical manner.

www.justinungar.com

September 12, 2012 @ 03:46 AM
stillwild

Post: 560

Join Date: Jan 2012

Location: US

@lamash

I know that it was just the hat.
The hat was the least original piece and the least creative.

From a business standpoint, the restock makes perfect sense, but from a consumer standpoint?
It's like if Supreme reprinted something from their first collection, the brand couldn't help but be tarnished -- same with B.G. up until this point, they've worked under the same exclusivity model as Supreme, but all of a sudden it's okay for them to change their model just because of a demand?

Supreme has plenty of demand, they certainly wouldn't buckle, not only because it's been years and it would do noticeable damage to their rep, but people would hate on them for ABANDONING THEIR promise.

What more does a brand have to accomplish than to adhere to it's brand promise? I think worked out ok, 'cause B.G. wasn't all about exclusivity, it was just a component, but still, sell-out.


I don't believe one can compare Supreme and BG. They operate under two completely different philosophies and business models. Supreme is a faceless entity, with no real one-on-one customer relationship. Benny Gold, however, is a brand built by and named after one man. BG's manner of business involves forming and maintaining relationships on a personal level with consumers, supporters, and fellow brands alike. If loyal people with whom he interacts with on both a regular and business basis express their dismay for missing out on something he himself created, I don't blame the man for listening. He states on his blog, "a lot of our key store accounts and customers missed out on them so we re-ran a VERY LIMITED amount." This means the small restock fulfills demand on the behalf of both contracted vendors and an integral client base. Rather than "selling out," I see it as more of an olive branch extended to disappointed fans and suppliers alike who had the misfortune of missing out on the release. Not to mention he's one man with a personally-run retail space and people on the payroll, along with a new family. I don't feel his creativity has been hindered a bit by the need to operate his business in a practical manner.


I don't think the size of the re-print matters, he just said it that way, I feel, so that it seemed less like he was doing a full re-print, and contradicting himself.

How is it an olive branch?
Those same people, who likely have been following Benny Gold for seasons have seen lines come and go, I'm sure this isn't the first time he's received requests for reprints.

B.G & Supreme are different in a lot of ways, but until this point, I'd like to see you provide evidence that they didn't both operate on the same model of exclusivity.

Until you can, with this collection, B.G. simply caved to demand.

If you've ever e-mailed Supreme, or went to their physical space, they actually do have customer service and are brilliant with it.

www.stillwild.co / online store that celebrates nature!

September 12, 2012 @ 03:55 AM
stillwild

Post: 560

Join Date: Jan 2012

Location: US

@lamash

I feel you are not answering objectively.

Forget Benny Gold.

Lets talk Supreme. Say you can't compare them. But until this release (unless you can prove otherwise, factually, they operated on the same model.)

How were their models different? Sure their philosophies are miles apart. But compare THEIR BUSINESS MODELS.

- seasonal lines.
- no REPRINTS EVER.
- typical streetwear staples (tees, etc).

Now that they're working on the same model. Lets talk only about Supreme.

Honestly,
would you be ok with Supreme doing a reprint? Even if there was a huge amount of demand. (forgetting their brand, other than that model, and brand promise of exclusivity).

Why should you be? You'd be right not to be.

Brands are like your friends.
Their value is through their interaction with you (products, services, what have you),
and they deliver continuously on that value with that within the context of the brand promise.

Just like your friend, why would you be ok with a brand you trust, breaking their promise? Even if a lot of people asked them to?

www.stillwild.co / online store that celebrates nature!

September 12, 2012 @ 03:58 AM
stillwild

Post: 560

Join Date: Jan 2012

Location: US

@jakeocean

I don't think you're answering objectively here.





I like Benny as much as anyone else, and there are unique elements to the line (the packaging @lamash mentioned is sheer genius).

But I'll be damned if I support stagnancy, no matter if I like the brand or not.

Pendleton v. Benny Gold for the record.
Looks like the exact same thing, with different shapes, doesn't seem like too much of a twist (save for the shapes).

His accessory brand was the most promising aspect of the brand! I agree so unique.
So why go and do what all his competition is doing now?
I can't help but think it was the graphic designer in him, wanting a crack at the trend, even so, no pass from me.

www.stillwild.co / online store that celebrates nature!

September 12, 2012 @ 04:01 AM
Jake Ocean

Post: 752

Join Date: Jan 2012

Location: Los Angeles

@lamash

I know that it was just the hat.
The hat was the least original piece and the least creative.

From a business standpoint, the restock makes perfect sense, but from a consumer standpoint?
It's like if Supreme reprinted something from their first collection, the brand couldn't help but be tarnished -- same with B.G. up until this point, they've worked under the same exclusivity model as Supreme, but all of a sudden it's okay for them to change their model just because of a demand?

Supreme has plenty of demand, they certainly wouldn't buckle, not only because it's been years and it would do noticeable damage to their rep, but people would hate on them for ABANDONING THEIR promise.

What more does a brand have to accomplish than to adhere to it's brand promise? I think worked out ok, 'cause B.G. wasn't all about exclusivity, it was just a component, but still, sell-out.


I don't believe one can compare Supreme and BG. They operate under two completely different philosophies and business models. Supreme is a faceless entity, with no real one-on-one customer relationship. Benny Gold, however, is a brand built by and named after one man. BG's manner of business involves forming and maintaining relationships on a personal level with consumers, supporters, and fellow brands alike. If loyal people with whom he interacts with on both a regular and business basis express their dismay for missing out on something he himself created, I don't blame the man for listening. He states on his blog, "a lot of our key store accounts and customers missed out on them so we re-ran a VERY LIMITED amount." This means the small restock fulfills demand on the behalf of both contracted vendors and an integral client base. Rather than "selling out," I see it as more of an olive branch extended to disappointed fans and suppliers alike who had the misfortune of missing out on the release. Not to mention he's one man with a personally-run retail space and people on the payroll, along with a new family. I don't feel his creativity has been hindered a bit by the need to operate his business in a practical manner.


I don't think the size of the re-print matters, he just said it that way, I feel, so that it seemed less like he was doing a full re-print, and contradicting himself.

How is it an olive branch?
Those same people, who likely have been following Benny Gold for seasons have seen lines come and go, I'm sure this isn't the first time he's received requests for reprints.

B.G & Supreme are different in a lot of ways, but until this point, I'd like to see you provide evidence that they didn't both operate on the same model of exclusivity.

Until you can, with this collection, B.G. simply caved to demand.

If you've ever e-mailed Supreme, or went to their physical space, they actually do have customer service and are brilliant with it.


he didn't say customer service, he said customer relationship. i have never seen supreme commit to personal customer relationship. the only customer relationship i have with supreme is an email once a week on their web shop.
for an example, i built a personal relationship with benny, ( i'm sure along with many other people), and he even blogged about me a long with another small brand. it made my day when i found out about it, and it was because benny was willing to go the extra mile to connect with his fans and be appreciative.

http://www.distantlight.co

September 12, 2012 @ 04:07 AM
Bulldog

Post: 75

Join Date: Feb 2012

@lamash

I know that it was just the hat.
The hat was the least original piece and the least creative.

From a business standpoint, the restock makes perfect sense, but from a consumer standpoint?
It's like if Supreme reprinted something from their first collection, the brand couldn't help but be tarnished -- same with B.G. up until this point, they've worked under the same exclusivity model as Supreme, but all of a sudden it's okay for them to change their model just because of a demand?

Supreme has plenty of demand, they certainly wouldn't buckle, not only because it's been years and it would do noticeable damage to their rep, but people would hate on them for ABANDONING THEIR promise.

What more does a brand have to accomplish than to adhere to it's brand promise? I think worked out ok, 'cause B.G. wasn't all about exclusivity, it was just a component, but still, sell-out.


I don't believe one can compare Supreme and BG. They operate under two completely different philosophies and business models. Supreme is a faceless entity, with no real one-on-one customer relationship. Benny Gold, however, is a brand built by and named after one man. BG's manner of business involves forming and maintaining relationships on a personal level with consumers, supporters, and fellow brands alike. If loyal people with whom he interacts with on both a regular and business basis express their dismay for missing out on something he himself created, I don't blame the man for listening. He states on his blog, "a lot of our key store accounts and customers missed out on them so we re-ran a VERY LIMITED amount." This means the small restock fulfills demand on the behalf of both contracted vendors and an integral client base. Rather than "selling out," I see it as more of an olive branch extended to disappointed fans and suppliers alike who had the misfortune of missing out on the release. Not to mention he's one man with a personally-run retail space and people on the payroll, along with a new family. I don't feel his creativity has been hindered a bit by the need to operate his business in a practical manner.


I don't think the size of the re-print matters, he just said it that way, I feel, so that it seemed less like he was doing a full re-print, and contradicting himself.

How is it an olive branch?
Those same people, who likely have been following Benny Gold for seasons have seen lines come and go, I'm sure this isn't the first time he's received requests for reprints.

B.G & Supreme are different in a lot of ways, but until this point, I'd like to see you provide evidence that they didn't both operate on the same model of exclusivity.

Until you can, with this collection, B.G. simply caved to demand.

If you've ever e-mailed Supreme, or went to their physical space, they actually do have customer service and are brilliant with it.


Unfortunately, I can't bring myself to keyboard-warrior another brief essay in defense of a brand I have zero personal association with. I doubt either one of us will be convinced by the other as to what defines "selling out." As I stated before, I simply do not believe a limited-run restock of one item designates selling out; nor have I seen BG's exploration into current trends to be anything more than a demonstration of how vast his creative span can reach. After this long debate over how original or unoriginal the Benny Gold collection is as of this season, my initial point still stands as true- originality does not simply equate to success. You believe BG to be a sellout; I simply said he found further success through charting new territory in a relatively crowded trend.

The path that this conversation has taken has diverted immensely from the initial debate of originality in correlation to success within brand practice. Bringing it back to the original topic on-hand, I can understand the initial points you were making in terms of questioning the originality of some designs shared on this thread. However, we must practice what we preach. Is the visual identity of your brand, as well as the artwork and philosophy behind it, original? Not only that, but is it successful? Circling back to my initial post, one does not equal the other, though both aspects (especially the latter) are typically met when branding is carried out properly.

www.justinungar.com

September 12, 2012 @ 04:11 AM
♥♥♥♥☮☮☮☮☮♥♥♥♥♥⚐⚑☺☺☺

Post: 1606

Join Date: Jul 2012

Location: Pretty boy central

@lamash

I know that it was just the hat.
The hat was the least original piece and the least creative.

From a business standpoint, the restock makes perfect sense, but from a consumer standpoint?
It's like if Supreme reprinted something from their first collection, the brand couldn't help but be tarnished -- same with B.G. up until this point, they've worked under the same exclusivity model as Supreme, but all of a sudden it's okay for them to change their model just because of a demand?

Supreme has plenty of demand, they certainly wouldn't buckle, not only because it's been years and it would do noticeable damage to their rep, but people would hate on them for ABANDONING THEIR promise.

What more does a brand have to accomplish than to adhere to it's brand promise? I think worked out ok, 'cause B.G. wasn't all about exclusivity, it was just a component, but still, sell-out.


I don't believe one can compare Supreme and BG. They operate under two completely different philosophies and business models. Supreme is a faceless entity, with no real one-on-one customer relationship. Benny Gold, however, is a brand built by and named after one man. BG's manner of business involves forming and maintaining relationships on a personal level with consumers, supporters, and fellow brands alike. If loyal people with whom he interacts with on both a regular and business basis express their dismay for missing out on something he himself created, I don't blame the man for listening. He states on his blog, "a lot of our key store accounts and customers missed out on them so we re-ran a VERY LIMITED amount." This means the small restock fulfills demand on the behalf of both contracted vendors and an integral client base. Rather than "selling out," I see it as more of an olive branch extended to disappointed fans and suppliers alike who had the misfortune of missing out on the release. Not to mention he's one man with a personally-run retail space and people on the payroll, along with a new family. I don't feel his creativity has been hindered a bit by the need to operate his business in a practical manner.


I don't think the size of the re-print matters, he just said it that way, I feel, so that it seemed less like he was doing a full re-print, and contradicting himself.

How is it an olive branch?
Those same people, who likely have been following Benny Gold for seasons have seen lines come and go, I'm sure this isn't the first time he's received requests for reprints.

B.G & Supreme are different in a lot of ways, but until this point, I'd like to see you provide evidence that they didn't both operate on the same model of exclusivity.

Until you can, with this collection, B.G. simply caved to demand.

If you've ever e-mailed Supreme, or went to their physical space, they actually do have customer service and are brilliant with it.


Unfortunately, I can't bring myself to keyboard-warrior another brief essay in defense of a brand I have zero personal association with. I doubt either one of us will be convinced by the other as to what defines "selling out." As I stated before, I simply do not believe a limited-run restock of one item designates selling out; nor have I seen BG's exploration into current trends to be anything more than a demonstration of how vast his creative span can reach.

The path that this conversation has taken has diverted immensely from the initial debate of originality in correlation to success within brand practice. Bringing it back to the original topic on-hand, I can understand the initial points you were making in terms of questioning the originality of some designs shared on this thread. However, we must practice what we preach. Is the visual identity of your brand, as well as the artwork and philosophy behind it, original? Not only that, but is it successful? Circling back to my initial post, one does not equal the other, though both aspects (especially the latter) are typically met when branding is carried out properly.

Lemme get a free shirt bruh

https://soundcloud.com/tobiokami/okami-tobiokami https://soundcloud.com/tobiokami/okami-tobiokami MY MUSIC---

September 12, 2012 @ 04:11 AM
stillwild

Post: 560

Join Date: Jan 2012

Location: US

@lamash

I know that it was just the hat.
The hat was the least original piece and the least creative.

From a business standpoint, the restock makes perfect sense, but from a consumer standpoint?
It's like if Supreme reprinted something from their first collection, the brand couldn't help but be tarnished -- same with B.G. up until this point, they've worked under the same exclusivity model as Supreme, but all of a sudden it's okay for them to change their model just because of a demand?

Supreme has plenty of demand, they certainly wouldn't buckle, not only because it's been years and it would do noticeable damage to their rep, but people would hate on them for ABANDONING THEIR promise.

What more does a brand have to accomplish than to adhere to it's brand promise? I think worked out ok, 'cause B.G. wasn't all about exclusivity, it was just a component, but still, sell-out.


I don't believe one can compare Supreme and BG. They operate under two completely different philosophies and business models. Supreme is a faceless entity, with no real one-on-one customer relationship. Benny Gold, however, is a brand built by and named after one man. BG's manner of business involves forming and maintaining relationships on a personal level with consumers, supporters, and fellow brands alike. If loyal people with whom he interacts with on both a regular and business basis express their dismay for missing out on something he himself created, I don't blame the man for listening. He states on his blog, "a lot of our key store accounts and customers missed out on them so we re-ran a VERY LIMITED amount." This means the small restock fulfills demand on the behalf of both contracted vendors and an integral client base. Rather than "selling out," I see it as more of an olive branch extended to disappointed fans and suppliers alike who had the misfortune of missing out on the release. Not to mention he's one man with a personally-run retail space and people on the payroll, along with a new family. I don't feel his creativity has been hindered a bit by the need to operate his business in a practical manner.


I don't think the size of the re-print matters, he just said it that way, I feel, so that it seemed less like he was doing a full re-print, and contradicting himself.

How is it an olive branch?
Those same people, who likely have been following Benny Gold for seasons have seen lines come and go, I'm sure this isn't the first time he's received requests for reprints.

B.G & Supreme are different in a lot of ways, but until this point, I'd like to see you provide evidence that they didn't both operate on the same model of exclusivity.

Until you can, with this collection, B.G. simply caved to demand.

If you've ever e-mailed Supreme, or went to their physical space, they actually do have customer service and are brilliant with it.


he didn't say customer service, he said customer relationship. i have never seen supreme commit to personal customer relationship. the only customer relationship i have with supreme is an email once a week on their web shop.
for an example, i built a personal relationship with benny, ( i'm sure along with many other people), and he even blogged about me a long with another small brand. it made my day when i found out about it, and it was because benny was willing to go the extra mile to connect with his fans and be appreciative.


Sorry, I misread.

Like I said, biased all the same.

Imagine how many people do not get their e-mails answered by Benny. Does that mean he's lacking in the customer relationship department?

But I don't really think you can compare their customer relationships building, they have to be measured differently,

in the same way, your local coffee shop and starbucks would have to.

Benny Gold is a man brand (essentially) so he can connect with more people than Supreme (yes, Supreme is essentially "faceless", in that they aren't represented by a single face, but rather the supreme skate shop staff and Supreme's ideology, this more than the former).

Because Supreme is represented more by an ideology than a person; it would make sense they have different communications strategies, neither is less valid in terms of customer relationships.

I have a great one with Supreme, it might not be personal, but they deliver time and time again.

www.stillwild.co / online store that celebrates nature!

September 12, 2012 @ 04:14 AM
♥♥♥♥☮☮☮☮☮♥♥♥♥♥⚐⚑☺☺☺

Post: 1606

Join Date: Jul 2012

Location: Pretty boy central

Stop quoting theres an @ button

https://soundcloud.com/tobiokami/okami-tobiokami https://soundcloud.com/tobiokami/okami-tobiokami MY MUSIC---


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