Photographing random ppl. How do you do it? Do you ask? On the low? Very forward?

February 28, 2012 @ 01:55:21 AM
Post: 1677
Join Date: Jul 2008
How do you do it? I like to do it on the low because you can get the essence of the scene not someone posing
February 28, 2012 @ 01:59:54 AM
Post: 366
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Heaven
can you post some pic?
February 28, 2012 @ 03:56:44 AM
Post: 2341
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: SD \\ CHI
depends

most of the time i just take it, but some people might get mad if you don't ask

helps to not have a loud shutter
February 28, 2012 @ 18:22:47 PM
Post: 397
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: US
just take it. If they get mad just delete it, but you have the right to photograph them so they can't really do anything.
February 28, 2012 @ 19:30:33 PM
Post: 67
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Toronto
I just start thanking them after I take it, they're usually just surprised and walk away lol
March 04, 2012 @ 18:20:18 PM
Post: 218
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: HARLEM WORLD


I wish ,I had the balls to do this.
March 04, 2012 @ 23:38:17 PM
Post: 256
Join Date: May 2011
Location: ATL
the trick is to have no shame and look like a total tourist.
March 05, 2012 @ 00:12:30 AM
Post: 326
Join Date: Dec 2010
both possible. some people don't like it though. try some
March 05, 2012 @ 01:20:25 AM
Post: 954
Join Date: Aug 2010


This video is hilarious.

As for street photography... literally you bring your camera with you, put the viewfinder up to your eye when you have a good chance with a good shot, and snap. If someone says something you either run away or say sorry, otherwise just snap and move on. Chances are people will just give you a dirty look, but the first time is definitely the scariest, after that it's way easier.

www.jacobskoglund.com | www.jacobsphotobooth.tumblr.com

March 05, 2012 @ 01:57:43 AM
Post: 1677
Join Date: Jul 2008


This video is hilarious.

As for street photography... literally you bring your camera with you, put the viewfinder up to your eye when you have a good chance with a good shot, and snap. If someone says something you either run away or say sorry, otherwise just snap and move on. Chances are people will just give you a dirty look, but the first time is definitely the scariest, after that it's way easier.


Lol@ run away
March 05, 2012 @ 11:31:29 AM
Post: 1314
Join Date: Apr 2008
I just snap. I've never got mean mug, only from homeless people. But most people in the northwest are pretty chill about it. If they ask me about it I just say I'm shooting on location for my school paper lol. Most of my friends know I like to take candid shots so they don't even bother posing anymore.
March 05, 2012 @ 12:16:23 PM
Post: 40
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: NYC
I usually inform them that I'm a photographer working on a project and I would like their photo, then I'll give em my card so they can see their photo. But I only do that if I want their attention, if it's a candid shot, I snap and go.

#DiE

March 05, 2012 @ 14:43:19 PM
Post: 366
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Heaven
I hate when people do mean mug tho...I'll try put my stealth mode on. #FoxHound
March 06, 2012 @ 07:52:47 AM
Post: 105
Join Date: May 2011
Location: VA
these niggas fakes....peep dis. Your text to link here... hit me up for more info and specific questions i am very good at this.....for real doe.
March 07, 2012 @ 02:18:55 AM
Post: 1799
Join Date: May 2011
Location: California
Originally posted by Inactive User


I wish ,I had the balls to do this.

This had me in tears

.

March 07, 2012 @ 03:19:48 AM
Post: 1782
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Illmatic, Track 2
March 07, 2012 @ 12:05:04 PM
Post: 1677
Join Date: Jul 2008
March 07, 2012 @ 20:02:58 PM
Post: 3407
Join Date: Aug 2009
Hi im a photographer i like ______________, can i take your pic?


Untitled by MrEllis, on Flickr


lance by MrEllis, on Flickr


dino by MrEllis, on Flickr

all I do is sip espressos and listen to AZ -mrelllis.tumblr.com

March 11, 2012 @ 03:09:45 AM
Post: 344
Join Date: Jan 2008
Originally posted by Inactive User


I wish ,I had the balls to do this.

That's a pretty awesome video and I'm surprised I never saw it. I think that's what photography is all about. Most of us find it really, really hard to pass up a photo op and our lives are full of them. I think that what this guy is doing is pretty much the efficient way of gathering photos of the real world and life. We set up shots all the time and take shots of inanimate objects, but to get actual photos of life in motion takes an eye and effort. One thing that I noticed in the video was at the end when he did get some objection by the three guys at the tourist bus. The man told him that he had to ask for permission. From what I have always known, you don't have to ask for a person's permission when taking public shots. That if a person is out in view of the public, it is OK to take their picture. We can not photograph people when they are under the impression that they have privacy.

At the same time though, I really think it is awesome what the photographer did in this video when he went back as they were complaining and deleted the photo. I think if you are going to shoot people and get in their space, you definitely should respect them and their wishes. I never did this before, but here is a suggestion: maybe when we shoot someone on the street, we could carry some business cards and if we feel comfortable with them, we could give them one to direct them to our photography website on the internet.

The other thing about shooting in public is children. He took a shot of the little boy getting into the car with his mother standing there. I think that it is a good idea to not use his method with children, especially to peer into their private property (their car). Minors and peering into a vehicle to shoot them is not a good combination.

As for general ideas on shooting in public ... it is up to the photographer whether they feel comfortable or not. Also, I always remember learning that it is a good idea to have a long lens to be less imposing on a subject. You could be clear across a park and still get a good shot of someone on the other side if you have a good lens.
March 11, 2012 @ 03:13:19 AM
Post: 344
Join Date: Jan 2008


This video is hilarious.

As for street photography... literally you bring your camera with you, put the viewfinder up to your eye when you have a good chance with a good shot, and snap. If someone says something you either run away or say sorry, otherwise just snap and move on. Chances are people will just give you a dirty look, but the first time is definitely the scariest, after that it's way easier.

Great advice.
March 14, 2012 @ 12:17:42 PM
Post: 218
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: HARLEM WORLD
Originally posted by Inactive User


I wish ,I had the balls to do this.

That's a pretty awesome video and I'm surprised I never saw it. I think that's what photography is all about. Most of us find it really, really hard to pass up a photo op and our lives are full of them. I think that what this guy is doing is pretty much the efficient way of gathering photos of the real world and life. We set up shots all the time and take shots of inanimate objects, but to get actual photos of life in motion takes an eye and effort. One thing that I noticed in the video was at the end when he did get some objection by the three guys at the tourist bus. The man told him that he had to ask for permission. From what I have always known, you don't have to ask for a person's permission when taking public shots. That if a person is out in view of the public, it is OK to take their picture. We can not photograph people when they are under the impression that they have privacy.

At the same time though, I really think it is awesome what the photographer did in this video when he went back as they were complaining and deleted the photo. I think if you are going to shoot people and get in their space, you definitely should respect them and their wishes. I never did this before, but here is a suggestion: maybe when we shoot someone on the street, we could carry some business cards and if we feel comfortable with them, we could give them one to direct them to our photography website on the internet.

The other thing about shooting in public is children. He took a shot of the little boy getting into the car with his mother standing there. I think that it is a good idea to not use his method with children, especially to peer into their private property (their car). Minors and peering into a vehicle to shoot them is not a good combination.

As for general ideas on shooting in public ... it is up to the photographer whether they feel comfortable or not. Also, I always remember learning that it is a good idea to have a long lens to be less imposing on a subject. You could be clear across a park and still get a good shot of someone on the other side if you have a good lens.


You should also check out this guy.


I think it's really cool that photographer are adopting this Bruce Gilden approach to street photography, because if nobody did we wouldnt have such great pictures being taken but at the same time if somebody came up to me in the street with a Mamiya 7 and a flash, I would feel kinda violated.
March 15, 2012 @ 03:45:17 AM
Post: 344
Join Date: Jan 2008
Originally posted by Inactive User
You should also check out this guy.


I think it's really cool that photographer are adopting this Bruce Gilden approach to street photography, because if nobody did we wouldnt have such great pictures being taken but at the same time if somebody came up to me in the street with a Mamiya 7 and a flash, I would feel kinda violated.


Ah, that was dope. What he did in the very first scene of that video is kinda what I do. I kinda shoot so that people think I am actually filming something behind them. I get them thinking that they are actually in the way of my shot (not intending to make them feel bad), but in reality it is THEM that I am shooting. I will pretend in an exagerrated way that I am trying to focus something behind long before they reach me, but all along I am really setting up my focus and framing with them. LOL Sometimes they will react as though they are sorry for getting in my way.

That guy's shots are pretty nice. At first I thought he was getting bad moments, but then the video started showing his images and he has quite some characters. LOL The girls were all gangsta-like and the fashion of those folks over there was another subject in itself. At some points it looked like he was shooting Mafia type dudes.

Apparently his name is Okawa Keiko and the video says "To Be Continued." I'm going to look him up. His name is Japanese, wonder if he is from Japan.
March 15, 2012 @ 06:38:41 AM
Post: 3407
Join Date: Aug 2009
Originally posted by Inactive User
Originally posted by Inactive User


I wish ,I had the balls to do this.

That's a pretty awesome video and I'm surprised I never saw it. I think that's what photography is all about. Most of us find it really, really hard to pass up a photo op and our lives are full of them. I think that what this guy is doing is pretty much the efficient way of gathering photos of the real world and life. We set up shots all the time and take shots of inanimate objects, but to get actual photos of life in motion takes an eye and effort. One thing that I noticed in the video was at the end when he did get some objection by the three guys at the tourist bus. The man told him that he had to ask for permission. From what I have always known, you don't have to ask for a person's permission when taking public shots. That if a person is out in view of the public, it is OK to take their picture. We can not photograph people when they are under the impression that they have privacy.

At the same time though, I really think it is awesome what the photographer did in this video when he went back as they were complaining and deleted the photo. I think if you are going to shoot people and get in their space, you definitely should respect them and their wishes. I never did this before, but here is a suggestion: maybe when we shoot someone on the street, we could carry some business cards and if we feel comfortable with them, we could give them one to direct them to our photography website on the internet.

The other thing about shooting in public is children. He took a shot of the little boy getting into the car with his mother standing there. I think that it is a good idea to not use his method with children, especially to peer into their private property (their car). Minors and peering into a vehicle to shoot them is not a good combination.

As for general ideas on shooting in public ... it is up to the photographer whether they feel comfortable or not. Also, I always remember learning that it is a good idea to have a long lens to be less imposing on a subject. You could be clear across a park and still get a good shot of someone on the other side if you have a good lens.


You should also check out this guy.


I think it's really cool that photographer are adopting this Bruce Gilden approach to street photography, because if nobody did we wouldnt have such great pictures being taken but at the same time if somebody came up to me in the street with a Mamiya 7 and a flash, I would feel kinda violated.


lol that guy would get clocked in the face. he is so rude and obnoxious.

I get random pics taken of me sometimes I just usually smile but this guy was so in your face......he makes the final pic about him and not really capturing what the ppl were up too before running into him.

all I do is sip espressos and listen to AZ -mrelllis.tumblr.com

Please login first to reply.
x