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January 23, 2012 @ 10:28 AM
reversal

Post: 887

Join Date: Jul 2010

I just picked up a T3i on the cheap a few days ago and have been messing around with it. I always wanted to get into shooting, but never had any real photography knowledge. I've been looking around, and photography must be the single hardest thing to progress through as an artist. Yeah, you can take classes or even teach yourself, but photography enters so many realms of techniques and styles that it's hard to grasp it all. IMO, you can go through years of taking pictures, but you will still go so far in terms of developing techniques and stuff. True?

Where should I begin now. What is the best way to learn and grow in photography, especially for beginners? Any advice appreciated. P.S. this hobby be killing the bank doe
January 23, 2012 @ 02:23 PM
laxlife1234

Post: 991

Join Date: Aug 2010

So I was in your position as well less than a year ago. I have had a T3i for the past 9 or so months and to be honest I've learned so much. The biggest advice I've ever learned was to just shoot in Manual as it's a matter or trial and error to understand how light affects a photo as well as by using the camera in M you learn how aperture, ISO, and shutter speed affect one another.

I wouldn't recommend taking classes because they will just teach you how to use the camera in M and that is a big waste of money as it's easier to use on your own and you're going to wind up needing to know how to use it on your own since no one can really help you with that (just gotta learn the settings).. I would recommend taking photography classes when you become more advanced though especially when you want to learn flash photography and strobes and what not but to be honest it's also just a matter of trial and error.

My next piece of advice would be to pick up another lens besides the kit lens. I would recommend something cheap like a nifty 50. If you decide on a nifty fifty I wouldn't recommend the Canon 50mm f/1.4 as it has consistent issues with the build.

Last piece of advice... go out and experiment! Have fun while doing it! And be sure to not take a photo once a week try to take it out as much as possible as that's the best way to learn! And good luck man!

www.jacobskoglund.com | www.jacobsphotobooth.tumblr.com

January 23, 2012 @ 02:53 PM
White Walls

Post: 434

Join Date: Apr 2011

Location: Tennessee

Yeah lax pretty much said it. Just get out with your camera and shoot often. Use manual settings to learn how to setup shots the way you want them to look.

To get started, you really just need to understand your shutter speed, aperture, and ISO values.
ISO is how sensitive your sensor is to light. The higher the number, the brighter the photo will be. There will also be more digital noise in the image with high ISO. I try to use a low ISO setting whenever I can.
Shutter speed is how fast or slow your camera will take the picture and is measured in fractions of a second. I usually shoot (handheld) anywhere from 25-80 indoors and 200+ outdoors.
Aperture is how much light you're letting in to your camera. When adjusting your Manual settings, you'll see F/3.5 next to your shutter speed, that is your aperture. The lower the number, the more open your camera is. Your aperture is also going to increase the depth of field for your photos. Shooting with a higher aperture like F/10 will open up the amount of focus in the shot, compared to shooting at F/2 where you have a very shallow focus.

Good luck man! T3i is an awesome camera to start with. I second what Lax said about upgrading the lens as well. My first upgrade was a 50mm 1.8.

http://nickcrockett.tumblr.com/ http://theweightless.tumblr.com/

January 23, 2012 @ 09:51 PM
Shanklin

Post: 9593

Join Date: Nov 2006

To get started, you really just need to understand your shutter speed, aperture, and ISO values.


Bow.

But yea idk about getting a 50mm as your first upgrade; I mean I personally did get one as mine haha, but looking in retrospect I think a flash would have been a better choice for me. Both a flash and 50mm lens are viable pieces of equipment that will definitely help make you a better photographer. Ultimately when it comes down to it, it's all preference.

BTW, If you're having troube using M off rip, try to use CA, Creative Auto. That's how I first started, it's great too because it eventually teaches you how to use iso, ss, aperture.

edit-and super cosign on shooting often, i haven't been shooting for too long, but i'm still finding out new things about my camera and techniques solely due to experience lol.

http://kevinshanklin.com/ IF YOU HAVE A FFFOUND.COM INVITE MSG ME

January 23, 2012 @ 10:06 PM
Anti-Hero

Post: 453

Join Date: May 2010

Location: San Francisco

shoot, shoot, shoot, and shoot some more

I can't stress that enough, so many people will just get caught up behind their computer monitor trying to understand ISO, Aperture, and Shutter instead of shooting, they then eventually fall out of photography. Just keep shooting on Manual/ Aperture Priority and fiddle with the controls. Shooting everyday is a great exercise that will help you understand your camera and test your creativity and resourcefulness in finding subjects. Also going to your library and barnes 'n nobles to look at an artist photo book would help you understand some concepts of focus and composition.

And I wouldn't worry about upgrading lenses so fast, you shouldn't even think about it at this point. A dependence on new equipment will only hinder you as you become reliant on the equipment to make a great image, as opposed to yourself making the image. I didn't even upgrade from my kit lens for over a year after getting my first DSLR.

flickr.com/leavetownrightnow/

January 23, 2012 @ 10:41 PM
ak

Post: 1346

Join Date: Apr 2008

Shoot and shoot often. Be thoughtful of what you shoot. I feel like I've learned more about composition and lighting by thinking about what I shoot instead of snapping whatever. There's a difference between a thought out photo and a snap shot. You're photographs will only be as good as the locations you're in, don't wait for something interesting to come along. (ie get out of the house and shoot!) It took me a while to realize this lol. As far as different styles goes it depends on what you enjoy more, it'll develop more over time and take everything you read with a grain a salt when it comes to style.

My first upgrade was a 50mm 1.8 and a grip, but it would have been nice to have external flash. Also 50mm on a crop censor is real tight too so it's not that great for indoors. t3i is great, I have a t2i it hasn't let me down yet.

good luck man, also don't take it too seriously.. enjoy it.
January 24, 2012 @ 03:05 AM
edomanic

Post: 55

Join Date: Dec 2011

Location: Detroit

Yea I say get a flash, I'm basically in your position with a t2i, but I've been shooting for almost a year. I can't shoot at night or indoors because of low lighting leading me to get "creative" with the built in flash. The head on flash makes everything look flat, you can get more depth by bouncing the light off the ceiling and walls.

January 24, 2012 @ 05:39 AM
BKBROWN

Post: 2495

Join Date: Aug 2010

Location: SD \\ CHI

I don't really see the point in using manual mode if you already know what aperture / shutter speed / iso do

90% of the time I use aperture priority and 10% shutter priority.



after learning the basics it's all about content of your photos. Everyone starts off taking cliche boring photos at first, but few go beyond that

but anyways take photos of what you want

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January 24, 2012 @ 08:44 AM
reversal

Post: 887

Join Date: Jul 2010

Worrd. Very helpful responses. HB fam love. Today I slowly tried to learn shutter speed, aperture, and iso. A lot of trial and error, but most if not all said in this thread has been true for me.
January 31, 2012 @ 07:35 AM
whoRichard?

Post: 2114

Join Date: Jul 2009

Location: 714

Make sure you know what each button and control on your camera does, like what is the point of having those features if you don't put them to use. Also like everyone has said, the 50mm helped me learn ALOT about photography, in particular the functions of aperture and what not. I say as your next upgrade get a 35mm 1.8/50mm 1.8 either will be fine, I prefer the 35mm because i just think it seems more natural in terms of focal length, and the speedlight is not a necessity but if you are shooting at night a lot then it is a must have. Best of luck to you and just keep shooting man, continue to learn!!
April 29, 2012 @ 04:12 PM
comixfreak

Post: 109

Join Date: Mar 2012

I think we should all stop worrying to much about the gear we use. Ive spend hours after hours browsing photography sited to find that "perfect lens". But then I got really into analog photography, used just a point and shoot, and realized that its not about what camera you use, but what you make of it. Its you personal vision that makes a photograph great, not the fact that you used a 35mm or a 50mm lens. So my advice would be to not buy any new lens for a year, and use just one focal lenght. This way, you really get to know this lens. Ive done this with my old Nikon FE2 and a 50mm nikkor, and I learned so much. But most of all, just go out and shoot and, as posted above, have fun smile

http://comixfreak.tumblr.com

April 29, 2012 @ 06:24 PM
mikepanic

Post: 60

Join Date: Apr 2012

I read this in the late 90's - http://photo.net/learn/making-photographs/ - it's super easy to digest and takes maybe 20 minutes.

After that, I'm a contributing writer at http://lightstalking.com and have been shooting for 12+ years, focusing on fine art / fashion / look books / campaigns, but am well versed in many aspects in addition to my core areas of knowledge. Ask away
April 30, 2012 @ 07:38 PM
ANTHONEEE

Post: 805

Join Date: Aug 2009

Location: OKC

yeah everyone else pretty much said it all. shoot everyday if you can, shoot on manual, invest in prime lenses

http://anthonywho.com

April 30, 2012 @ 07:48 PM
peterclydepark

Post: 272

Join Date: Feb 2008

Location: NY/NJ/MD

learn the different set ups on the camera (will come in handy and learning more now before getting new equipment will help a lot)
shoot manual and try different ISOs, apertures, etc. etc.
since you have a t3i you should also mess with video. (knowing how to take pictures can translate well on video)
keep taking pictures!

DSLR Filmmakers, Need an affordable stabilizing system? Check this out: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/911359208/steadi- shoulder

April 30, 2012 @ 08:49 PM
mikepanic

Post: 60

Join Date: Apr 2012

Yea I'm going to go right ahead and disagree with the suggestions of shooting manual mode. It's over used and in no way will it make you a "better" photographer, or even allow you to progress. All it really does is show you the relationship between aperture and shutter speeds and how to get the light meter in the middle, which may not even be the correct exposure anyway.

Read the photo.net tutorial I posted earlier. Virtually every situation will clearly dictate what mode you should be in. Shoot landscapes, throw it in aperture priority mode and expect to get a tripod out if it's a cloudy day or you're shooting daybreak / dusk times. Shooting action shots, shutter priority mode then you decide if you want to stop all action, or stop the movement but still allow some motion blur. Location based portraits, aperture priority mode, set wide so you'll have some depth of field and give separation between subject and background.

Understanding how shutter speeds and aperture relate to each other and which to focus on will get you further ahead, faster. As important, is utilizing exposure compensation while shooting digital, in any mode.

Then, and only then, worry about adding on and off camera flash units and some more funky stuff.
May 1, 2012 @ 02:43 AM
reversal

Post: 887

Join Date: Jul 2010

I didn't notice that this thread came back up since I started the thread a few months ago. Since then I've had a lot of time to use my t3i. Still shooting with my kit lens. I have been shooting in manual and I have learned the general concept with shutter speed, aperture and ISO. A lot of trial and error went on and I still have a hard time shooting in indoor w/ low lighting.

mikepanic I know what you mean. My street photography, or at least my attempts at street photography, has definitely taught me that manual isn't everything. It just doesn't make sense to change values for every situation you run into on the street. Definitely gonna read that link you posted.

Just got an internship over the summer and I may get to do some small photoshoots. Next investment: good tripod.
May 1, 2012 @ 03:28 AM
laxlife1234

Post: 991

Join Date: Aug 2010

I didn't notice that this thread came back up since I started the thread a few months ago. Since then I've had a lot of time to use my t3i. Still shooting with my kit lens. I have been shooting in manual and I have learned the general concept with shutter speed, aperture and ISO. A lot of trial and error went on and I still have a hard time shooting in indoor w/ low lighting.

mikepanic I know what you mean. My street photography, or at least my attempts at street photography, has definitely taught me that manual isn't everything. It just doesn't make sense to change values for every situation you run into on the street. Definitely gonna read that link you posted.

Just got an internship over the summer and I may get to do some small photoshoots. Next investment: good tripod.


Congrats on the intern!

As far as shooting goes, it's good you learned about M exposure and how x affects y. For street I recommend aperture priority mode this way you set the aperture and you don't have to worry about shutter speed, it's much easier shooting with it vs. manual mode. Also you can usually get a quicker capture.

For a tri-pod I recommend not investing in a Gitzo. check out Manfrotto and if you're willing to drop a little cash I think the Manfrotto 055XPROB + ballhead can be had for <$250 as their is a special offer going on right now. I know that almost every photographer has this tri-pod. It's a bit of money but it will last you, don't buy a $50 cheapo tripod either you want a nice set of sturdy legs that wont break either.

www.jacobskoglund.com | www.jacobsphotobooth.tumblr.com

May 1, 2012 @ 10:29 AM
EYETOGRAPHY

Post: 536

Join Date: Jun 2009

Location: Psycho City

Ok so everyone here has pretty much told your their way of how they learned and what you should focus on but let me ask you. What do you want to shoot? From there then you can base what gear you need. And I hate to say because I've been saying it for so long(gear doesn't matter) but gear does actually matter. I mean in the respects that certain gear will get certain things done. Eventually you will start building your gear up but its going to help that you know what you want. Since you are just starting out I would recommend looking at other peoples work and see what appeals to you.

Another thing is shoot in RAW. I shoot JPG+RAW all the time. And I really regret not doing it since the beginning because being able to go back and reprocess old photos with new found processing techniques will save you a lot of heartache.

And since you are shooting CANON I would recommend Photography-on-the.net
As a source for more advice/information and just to lurk since they do have a lot of hobby and professional photographers who are members of the forum who can help you with your photography.
May 1, 2012 @ 11:52 PM
laxlife1234

Post: 991

Join Date: Aug 2010


And since you are shooting CANON I would recommend Photography-on-the.net
As a source for more advice/information and just to lurk since they do have a lot of hobby and professional photographers who are members of the forum who can help you with your photography.


This. I'm a member and I love it on there. Ever since I've joined I am always on there the most. Also I do want to mention Nikon members (quite a bit) are active on there as well. DPreview and FredMiranda are also 2 other alternative forums although I don't use either as they confuse the hell out of me (the layout that is).

I'm also going to agree that gear does matter. If you are asked to shoot a wedding and al you have is a kit lens, and relatively cheap DSLR with one flash chances are you're going to fail at it. Not fail at it cause you are bad but because chances are the gear you would be using isn't sufficient enough. Now I'm not saying get the state of the art gear, but I'm trying to prove a point, if you are into shooting skateboarding you're going to need ultra wide angle lenses and possibly a fisheye. Same goes for landscapes, for portraits you're going to want any lens >50mm so the distortion is minimal. Back to wedding photography if you ever plan to shoot a wedding make sure you have top of the line gear, especially lens wise, well, and camera body wise.

If you join POTN you're going to get a feeling for what Eyetography and I mean, even if you are just beginning there's a ton to learn.

www.jacobskoglund.com | www.jacobsphotobooth.tumblr.com

May 2, 2012 @ 02:39 AM

Inactive

Can someone go in depth for me on Aperture?
May 2, 2012 @ 03:37 AM
Shanklin

Post: 9593

Join Date: Nov 2006

^No but the higher the aperture number (f/8 f/16 f/22) the smaller opening of the lens. So basically, the higher the number the less light is registered, and the lower the number (f/1.2 f/1.8 f/2.5) the more light is registered.

So why would you choose a high aperture over a lower aperture and vice versa? Well, if you want to keep everything in the picture sharp (such as taking landscape shots), you would use a higher aperture, and if you want a shallow depth of field (such as for portraits) you would use a lower aperture.

Once you got the right aperture, then you set your shutter speed to compensate for the amount of light that is available. Example:It's mad sunny out and you want to take portraits outside, an aperture of f/2.5 with a fast shutter speed (125,250,500) would be ideal.

http://kevinshanklin.com/ IF YOU HAVE A FFFOUND.COM INVITE MSG ME

May 2, 2012 @ 04:05 AM
zeezyo

Post: 2459

Join Date: Mar 2008

Location: san francisco

Can someone go in depth for me on Aperture?

this made me lol

shoot like your life depended on it.

but besides that, dont delete photos too early. even if you dont initially like how they show up on your camera screen, it might look better when you bring it up on your comp.

After you get used to shooting in manual, I think the best thing is learning to compose pictures that you think are nice. You dont necessary need a diff lens either. the kit lens works great. read up on the rule of thirds and learn how to crop pictures for a better picture. Rule of thirds is real easy to you, and you may already be utilizing it anyways.

X

May 2, 2012 @ 09:09 AM
EYETOGRAPHY

Post: 536

Join Date: Jun 2009

Location: Psycho City

Can someone go in depth for me on Aperture?


Found an awesome explanation of exposure today on petapixel. I hope this helps you understand it a bit better. This actually is one of the best explanation I've seen in a long time. Enjoy!

player.vimeo.com/video/41174743
May 2, 2012 @ 03:32 PM
mikepanic

Post: 60

Join Date: Apr 2012

Can someone go in depth for me on Aperture?


Download this PDF, it should help: http://www.lightstalking.com/dof/

It's something I wrote maybe a year or two ago.
June 8, 2012 @ 01:57 AM
TEST/model

Post: 20

Join Date: Jun 2012

You don't have to spend a lot of money, you just have to shoot.

For me, at it's simplest it is MAKE or TAKE. Do you want to document what is in front of you or do you want create an image. Both are valid but the approach is quite different. Go to the library and look at the photo books, not the "how to", but the monographs and see what rocks you. Try to distill why those images work for you and then start to develop your own visual language.

Photography is really not about the gear, but I fully understand the appeal. Shoot on manual, master your camera and worship the light.

Have fun!

Victor

I just picked up a T3i on the cheap a few days ago and have been messing around with it. I always wanted to get into shooting, but never had any real photography knowledge. I've been looking around, and photography must be the single hardest thing to progress through as an artist. Yeah, you can take classes or even teach yourself, but photography enters so many realms of techniques and styles that it's hard to grasp it all. IMO, you can go through years of taking pictures, but you will still go so far in terms of developing techniques and stuff. True?

Where should I begin now. What is the best way to learn and grow in photography, especially for beginners? Any advice appreciated. P.S. this hobby be killing the bank doe
September 20, 2012 @ 07:44 AM
evomase

Post: 53

Join Date: Sep 2012

Location: San Francisco, Ca

nice

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