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Pen & Paper: Dalek

Having delivered various art forms from graffiti to structuralism, James Marshall, better known as Dalek, has been showcased in numerous publications including The New York Times, Juxtapoz and The Wall Street Journal for his progressive styles. As a military child who finished high school in Japan, he inevitably turned to the subcultures of punk rock, skateboarding, and graffiti for inclusion and identity. After developing a signature character in college named Space Monkey, which served as a visual manifestation for his feelings, his art hit a major turning point in 2001 when he worked as Takashi Murakami’s assistant. At that time Dalek had no sense of direction in his work, however after seeing a Murakami show at the Boston Museum he understood what he wanted and needed to do to invoke emotion with his art. Now having collaborated with renowned brands like Nike, Scion and Hurley, Dalek’s new body of work, including his recent Prism show and Psych Optic Black Light exhibit, revels in a profusion and hyper-abundance of color and space exploration. The influential artist offers a look into his personal sketchbook full with abstract characters and corporate logos.

Photography: Brandon Shigeta/HYPEBEAST

Date: Jun 15, 2012  /  Views: 13949  /  Author: Robert Marshall
Category: Arts  /  Tags: Dalek, Arts, Pen and paper