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Tough Times: A Look Into the Current State of Streetwear

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Amidst every day market speculation and news of retention bonuses looking to make their way into the pockets of faltering banking institution A.I.G., the current consumer confidence level in both the global economy and the institutions that got us into this mess are perhaps at an all-time low. As a global economy firmly entrenched in financial chaos and uncertainty, we’ve seen the unfortunate demise of numerous entities over various industries throughout the world. From banks and retailers, to various well-known brands, this tumultuous period in the world’s financial history has forever changed the lives of people today and undoubtedly for many years to come.

A few months back, we were approached by an unlikely individual in Michael Kink, Director of Policy Development & Special Counsel to touch on this sensitive subject. I went about approaching a few different influential members of our community ranging from retailers to designers in hopes of getting a better understanding of how they were coping as well as their thoughts on some of the greener pastures brought on by these difficult times. Some who ultimately opted to not participate had some initial unease in speaking about a topic which has plagued media sources day-in and day-out. Yet I looked to tackle this issue from a different perspective. While a handful of accounts regarding the faltering of major cornerstones of the global economy have been issued, few reports delved into the nooks and crannies of this creative community we all find great passion and interest in. I never looked to point out the obvious in terms of how crummy the times were, however I did want to see how the small and independent brand and boutique was getting by and how they looked to continue on their paths of being leaders in their respective fields.

Looking back, ever since things decidedly took a turn for the worse and the housing market had yet to truly hit rock-bottom, I already had a sense that a weeding process (as touched upon by some participants) was on the horizon. While this is an unfortunate by-product as brands and stores both try their best to capture the dollars from the shrinking wallets of consumers, cutting the fat seems like a necessary protocol. My condolences to those who have had the misfortune of closing up shop, but nevertheless we look forward to a stronger, better return to form for our industry as we turn the corner.

The next few pages are heavy and intensive in their subject matter but above all else offer a look into personalities that are much like you and I, not the multi-million dollar bonus totting suits and businesses who have fell on tough times through improper business practices. Through a genuine and accurate portrayal of the current state of affairs, you get a sense of how the likes of Chris Gibbs (Union), Hikmet Sugoer (Solebox), Arthur Chmielewski (HAVEN), Frank Liew (Quarters/Qubic), Erik Brunetti (FUCT) and Alyasha Moore (Fiberops) are working things out to the best of their abilities. Big thanks to the aforementioned participants as well as Michael Kink for the suggestion on this feature.

Text: Eugene Kan
Photo Credit: Alyasha Moore

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Alyasha Moore – Fiberops

What is your current strategy to keep busy and continue surviving given the current economic conditions? Has your philosophy on business changed?

Keep your eyes on the road and your hands on the wheel.

How do you approach risk-taking in this environment?

I think at this point, almost any situation is a risk to some extent. A lot more thought and research has to go into any situation one deals with financially. Scared money doesn’t make money.

What sort of lasting effect will the current situation have on your business/direction down the road?

I’ll let you know…Lots of folks try to sound impervious to the current economic state. Shit’s scary.

What sort of positives can you draw from this economic downturn if anything?

There is an old adage that says:

“ Necessity is the mother of invention.”

Hopefully, we will be seeing more differing styles and individual brand identities. Also, people/consumers start to explore/develop their own personal styles as opposed to proscribing to the mass market.

Have you been more keen on certain types of advertisement or more willing to open up?

Open Up? I would not say more keen, but definitely forced to be more creative about the avenues we use. Lots of word of mouth and viral marketing. Teaming up with companies in other industries to get the more exposure with less cost.

Do you feel that there’s a need to create a more commercial style to be successful rather than being innovative and pushing the envelope?

Uniqlo, Gap, and Old Navy have that locked down. The market unfortunately, is super saturated right now, there is room for alternative product again.

The issue becomes how to manufacture and get it to retail cost effectively. Interestingly, what was “alternative” and pushing the envelope has become commercial. Be on the lookout for some young upstarts to make a significant change in the near future. This usually happens in times of financial turmoil.

How has your manufacturing process changed? Are your products still created in the same areas as they were 12-18 months ago?

Unfortunately, we’ve had to find cheaper development. This compromises product quality but gets us in the competitive price range we need to be. Less development trips as well. In a strange way, it’s kind of cool in a challenging way. Makes you really challenge yourself more from a design process.

With many people stressing that through hard-times emerges new creativity and opportunity, how true is this?

Ultimately, when there is less money, people have to become more creative all the way around. I’d say it’s a very true statement.

For small start-up brands, do you have any suggestions given both saturation and economic factors breathing down their neck?

Think what is going to genuinely set you apart from the rest of the industry. Not some cheesy rehashed mission statement. Not your take on the same thing that everyone else is doing, but really spend time developing your own brand identity. If everyone else is looking at the same thing your product will stand out more. Don’t get caught up in being “the man” or the “it girl” … Focus on your craft, be creative in how you market yourself, work hard and your work will speak for itself.

Although a relatively general question, what has had the biggest impact on you from a business and personal perspective?

I’ve had to tighten up the belt. Be more mindful of biz and personal spending. What do we/I really NEED to be spending on ?

Any closing notes you’d like to finish off with?

Stock up on ramen kids … It’s going to be a rough road.

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Erik Brunetti – FUCT

What is your current strategy to keep busy and continue surviving given the current economic conditions? Has your philosophy on business changed?

Our current strategy is still very similar to what it has always been; I like to run my business lean. I cut out a majority of the fat years ago, meaning: print advertising, trade shows, and stocking excess inventory. For us, trade shows are a complete waste of money. The Internet is the new trade show, and it’s free of charge. Print catalogs have been replaced by PDF’s, the postal service and phone bills have been replaced by emails, magazines have been replaced by blogs and so on. Basically my business philosophy hasn’t changed, I have always been able to see through the facade of the “corporate presence” in this industry.

How do you approach risk-taking in this environment?

I don’t. If I have one iota of an item sitting on my shelves after ship date; I simply do not manufacture it. I produce what I can move. To be able to predict selling trends and so forth comes with 20 years of experience, however, I understand this is risky to newer companies who have not seen the re-birth, repetition and reoccurring themes of certain trends and items over the years.

What sort of lasting effect will the current situation have on your business/direction down the road?

That is hard to determine. My brand has always been very politically aware of what is going on in the world as a whole. The recent economic crash does not surprise me given the horrible foreign affairs the USA has consistently practiced over the years, that in which this economic meltdown is a direct result of. Unfortunately, for the entire world, the effect will last for a very long time; however, it will not change our direction, it will only make our brand more appropriate.

What sort of positives can you draw from this economic downturn if anything?

That is also hard to determine, and far too early to say. I see a lot of one sided media bullshit. Things will get worse before they get better. I guess a positive would be an actual revolution. A peoples government. When people get desperate, when they are starving with no jobs they will begin governing themselves. Their government has let them down and they will take control. That would be a positive.

Have you been more keen on certain types of advertisement or more willing to open up?

The complete opposite.

Do you feel that there’s a need to create a more commercial style to be successful rather than being innovative and pushing the envelope?

Not necessarily. However, I do feel the need to re-size the collection(s). Less pieces (items) with more potency has proven to be successful for us. As for pushing the envelope, we have always pushed the envelope; to release commercially “safe” items would be the death of my brand. My brand name itself is not commercially safe to begin with.

How has your manufacturing process changed? Are your products still created in the same areas as they were 12-18 months ago?

We have always and still continue to produce our products in California however the SSDD line is produced entirely in Japan.

With many people stressing that through hard-times emerges new creativity and opportunity, how true is this?

Very true. It’s the process of weeding out. I believe the truly strong and creative will be able to adapt and survive. It will make the brands that survive more socially and politically aware; very much like the 70′s during the DIY punk era. It will be a true test of the brands character.

For small start-up brands, do you have any suggestions given both saturation and economic factors breathing down their neck?

Don’t start a brand. Only a highly delusional person would start a brand in this financial climate; not to mention the over saturated nature of the industry. Very bad decision.

Although a relatively general question, what has had the biggest impact on you from a business and personal perspective?

I would say fighting so many battles my entire life, has in turn taught me how to chose my battles and make decisions and maneuvers to be victorious at the end of the day.

Any closing notes you’d like to finish off with?

Yes, I would like to address the economy discussion further, being that is the subject of this feature. I feel the people need to educate themselves on why the world is “running out of money”, to me it seems the U.S economy is held ransom by the military, its industries and the faux wars the government perpetrates around the world, thus creating an economy reliant on war and the manifestation of war and conflict. The countless arms contracts, munitions and technological deals benefit the wealthy capitalists who employ numerous people, who grow reliant on this industry as a whole. The U.S is continually creating enemies, manufacturing reasons for more arms deals. It is time to wake up and rise up. Have a look at were your tax dollars are going, you will be shocked and appalled. Thank you.

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Arthur Chmielewski – HAVEN

What is your current strategy to keep busy and continue surviving given the current economic conditions?

Honestly, despite the times we haven’t changed up our strategy too much. We are still experiencing a great amount of growth. We find ourselves busier than we have ever been. I find myself working lots of overtime, which is a good thing.

How have sales worked out for you, how important and necessary of a retail tool is it? What sort of effect will these massive sales throughout retail affect the consumer when things pick-up again?

We try not to have too many sales, but it is inevitably part of any retail business and sometimes we want to give our loyal customers a break. We do offer free shipping promos and promotional codes once in awhile to keep things rolling online as well. Our product selection is pretty unique so we have a bit of an advantage, as we are one of the few outlets for many of our brands in North America. I think that shops that have brands that are more readily available are going to have to be very competitive with their pricing. With online shops becoming more and more prevalent as of late it is becoming a very global market place. Customers are becoming more knowledgeable and are searching out the best deals they can find.

Have you been more keen on certain types of advertisement or more willing to open up if you traditionally didn’t advertise?

We have done a little more print advertising in the city. However it is still very minimal, word of mouth is still our main marketing tool. We concentrate most our efforts online. We try to keep our customers updated using the latest online tools such as Facebook, forums, blogs, and regular email newsletters. These are all free forms of marketing and are very effective. We also try to keep our website updated regularly to keep customers checking back frequently.

What sort of lasting effect will the current situation have on your business/direction down the road?

We are being a little more cautious but still expect to grow at a good rate despite the times. We continue to stick to our long term strategies with expansionary plans this year. I’m excited to see how things pan out.

What sort of positives can you draw from this economic downturn if anything?

Shops/brands are forced to adapt and become better in order to survive. Overall I think quality across the board will improve. Better shops, better brands, and better quality overall.

In the current economic landscape, what sort of styles do you feel are an easier sell, has buying become a little more commercial?

People are looking for more classic items and want their purchases to be quality. They want their garments to last them season after season if they are paying a premium. We still have to be conscious of trends, but we stick to our buying principles.

We have never been “commercial”. We continue to stick to our niche brands and want to grow with them in the long term.

How do you approach risk-taking in this environment?

This past season we have cut down on some fringe brands. We need to always evolve our brand list but also want to be able to support the brands that have been with us from the get go. We’ve also concentrated our resources into brands that have proven to sell through, good quality and good partnerships with us. We want to be able to work with brands closely and work together on building up the shops image as well as the image of their respective brands. I think this year we will dedicate more energy into branding unique products and collaborations that our customers can appreciate.

With many people stressing that through hard-times emerges new creativity and opportunity, how true is this?

This is totally true. Survival of the fittest. I have a feeling a lot of stores and brands are going through some rough times especially stateside and unfortunately a lot of them might call it quits this year. Those that see the need to evolve and have the available resources will make it through and prosper, and those that stay the same and not really change with the current environment will unfortunately be swallowed up.

For small start-up brands, do you have any suggestions given both saturation and economic factors breathing down their neck?

It’s a very tough time to start up a new brand I think. As a buyer I like to have a little bit of a proven track record. I want brands with global recognition and growth potential. New brands will have to go all out guns blazing. The market is over-saturated and there a very few brands that are providing something exciting and different. I think the days of starting a t-shirt line and evolving into a cut-and-sew program are gone. Myself, I am looking for something that I can say “Wow” that’s fresh, different, and exciting.

Although a relatively general question, what has had the biggest impact on you from a business and personal perspective?

The biggest impact for us has been the very volatile exchange rates. We import a lot of our brands and unfortunately the Canadian exchange rate has dropped quite a bit in such a short period of time. We try to provide the best pricing we can but unfortunately as of late we have had to increase a lot of prices quite significantly. We had placed a lot of orders 6 months ago thinking that our Canadian dollar would remain on par with the USD, but that hasn’t been the case. Local customers feel the impact the most unfortunately. Hopefully our Canadian Dollar can rebound, but for the time being we are being a little more careful with how much and what we bring in after factoring in customs and currency exchanges.

Any closing notes you’d like to finish off with?

Thanks to all our Edmonton/Canadian and customers worldwide for supporting us this past year and thanks to HYPEBEAST for including us in the feature.

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Frank Liew – Qubic/Quarters

What is your current strategy to keep busy and continue surviving given the current economic conditions?

The best advice I could give to anybody is to simply focus. That’s it, really. Don’t get swayed, don’t get distracted by side projects that might derail your focus. Stop complaining and mulling, and make it work. Focus on the business end, it’s easy to neglect it. I think most retailers will understand what I’m saying.

How have sales worked out for you, how important and necessary of a retail tool is it? What sort of effect will these massive sales throughout retail affect the consumer when things pick-up again?

So far we haven’t had the need to run any more sales than we normally do during our retail calendar, it’s a necessary retail tool to clear excess stock and free up cash flow as you can’t have 100% sell-through of every single brand in your store, otherwise you’d have nothing to sell two weeks after new product arrives. An empty store isn’t going to help you pay the rent. However, it is getting a bit tiresome if other stores on the street are doing it. On our street there have been retailers doing half-price sales since October 2008. I worry about how this devalues their brand – what’s going to happen when everything comes right again? You’re simply conditioning the market to then expect a certain price range and type of service from you. I’d be careful.

Have you been more keen on certain types of advertisement or more willing to open up if you traditionally didn’t advertise?

Not really. We have a much different approach to conventional advertising compared to other retailers though – in that we’ve never spent a cent on direct advertising. That’s been a strategy we’ve followed since our opening and it’s worked well for the foundation years of our business. We focus on advertising ourselves through different channels and with partnering up with other entities. We’re always thinking up of different ways of positioning our business, so even if we run a massive poster or magazine campaign in the future, we’re try and do something crazy or quirky about it. In my opinion there’s no excuse for lack of creativity, economic doom or not.

What sort of lasting effect will the current situation have on your business/direction down the road?

To be honest, I’m not sure. I don’t think the situation has affected our business per se, but I think it has affected the market. I think people are no longer going to accept what’s simply placed in front of them, and rightly so. Retailers are going to have to stay sharp on their toes if they want to keep up in the future. It’s already happening now.

What sort of positives can you draw from this economic downturn if anything?

I’m sure this will be echoed a lot through the other interviewees, but I believe the ones that come out of this “downturn” will cement themselves as the new order – both brands and high profile retailers. I’m not going to lie or sugar coat it, this economic situation is going to claim a few victims. As to who, only time will tell, but I think the ones who do show true passion for this industry and have so since the beginning will be the ones that will outlast the others. Perhaps a trial by fire?

In the current economic landscape, what sort of styles do you feel are an easier sell, has buying become a little more commercial?

The “commercial vs cool” battle is something that we tackle all the time, regardless of what economic situation we’re in. Perhaps this situation has pushed this a little further up the priority list in our buyer’s minds but I personally don’t think our buying has differed much. We have a certain look and selection for both our stores that we will maintain. You’ll always need commercial items to sell-through to sustain your “cool” items. Every successful store knows this, it’s the plain nature of the business. At least I hope they do. That said, for the uni-branded stores selling their own collection, don’t give up on your progressive items.

You can still do a few pieces per collection to maintain your identity, don’t give up on it yet.

How do you approach risk-taking in this environment?

The most important thing is to at least recognize that the risk exists. I’ve spoken to quite a few retailers over the past few months, and it’s the ones that continually believe that they are absolutely invulnerable to the current economic situation that sort of worry me, especially the ones who are telling me this whilst standing in front of their very obviously overloaded (stock) store. You might be trading well now, but what’s there to say that you might not be affected in the back end of the year when your indents arrive? Think ahead and make calculated steps. Think twice about your steps before you make them and don’t let little voices influence you. That’s how we approach it.

With many people stressing that through hard-times emerges new creativity and opportunity, how true is this?

I’m not sure if I could call it new creativity, as I don’t think creativity should be limited or exacerbated by “economic” factors, but I suppose it is a good time for brands and other creative fields to really re-think their work, and look internally to see what they can do better. That said, I personally believe this is more due to the saturation of our market over the past few years than the tough economic climate.

For small start-up brands, do you have any suggestions given both saturation and economic factors breathing down their neck?

Take it easy. I know sometimes you just want to make massive leaps and bounds but remember, five great products can speak a helluva lot louder than fifty generic ones. There’s no need to come guns a blazin’ and try and to create a gargantuan collection to prove a point. Pick your steps carefully. Good products position brands.

Although a relatively general question, what has had the biggest impact on you from a business and personal perspective?

It’s been interesting seeing a textbook scenario come to life, and seeing the way a certain market reacts to it. This to me is a real privilege, as it’s quite a rare occurrence that you can see a single event slowly ripple outwards to such far reaching parts of the overall spectrum. I’m all for learning lessons, and I’m in awe of this moment in history we’re in. I don’t see it as a bad thing, if anything, it has made all of us understand the market and consumer a lot better. It has also been comforting for us to see that what we’ve done over the past couple of years have been the right steps, as we’re still trading above our 2008 figures right now and hitting our growth targets. Sometimes knowing when you’ve done something right can be a lot more harder to find out than when you’ve done something wrong.

Any closing notes you’d like to finish off with?

I think everybody needs to stop and breathe for a second. Consumers, support your independents. Retailers, stop blaming everything on “the recession”. Don’t be lazy. It doesn’t explain why you should ignore customers who walk in your front door. You know how it works. People moan to me about how it’s all media hype – but I don’t entirely believe that. I think there is a general paradigm shift at the moment kick-started by the economic situation in where people are now waking up and evaluating the way they’ve been spending, regardless of whether or not they’ve been hit in the pocket by the housing crunch or lost an entire stock portfolio. For our industry, I strongly believe the spending is still out there. I see it every day when I view our reports. People who were into it before the crunch are still into it now, I don’t think I’ve met a single person who’s completely given up on buying clothes & footwear just because the GDP has shrunken for the last two consecutive quarters. People still appreciate good product, and good service. It’s still a relatively young crowd, they’re flexible. Remember why you got into this in the first place. The need, the addiction, the want. That’s what your customers still feel, despite what you may think. If you can capture that then you’re set.

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Chris Gibbs – Union

What is your current strategy to keep busy and continue surviving given the current economic conditions?

We have streamlined our orders and lowered our overhead some.

How have sales worked out for you, how important and necessary of a retail tool is it? What sort of effect will these massive sales throughout retail affect the consumer when things pick-up again?

Sales are a great tool and we have used them well. This fall we offered many different promotions in order to get customers in the stores and they were quite successful. One has to be careful that we don’t get the customer too accustomed to sales, because if we do the customer might only shop when things are on sale. Although sales help and we like to offer them to our customers, if we were only able to sell our product at a discount. We would shortly go out of business.

Have you been more keen on certain types of advertisement or more willing to open up if you traditionally didn’t advertise?

The traditional advertising has never been a good outlet for us because we are not a traditional store. We have been more creative with our marketing as of late and it has definitely paid off.

What sort of lasting effect will the current situation have on your business/direction down the road?

I feel like it will make us better. When times were better, people would buy just about anything. Now that most people don’t have the same amount of discretionary income, they are more focused in their shopping which has forced us to become more focused in our buying.

What sort of positives can you draw from this economic downturn if anything?

Out industry has become a little stagnant and it kind of needed a shake up. Crisis by definition means a turning point. We are at a turning point in our industry. The cream rises to the top and we’d like to think that at this turning point the cream will rise again. In a sense, we have gone back to what made us successful in the first place. Quality over quantity.

In the current economic landscape, what sort of styles do you feel are an easier sell, has buying become a little more commercial?

Quite the opposite. My buying has become less commercial. What has helped us survive these times has been our special product. Something you can’t get anywhere else. The brands and businesses that are struggling all have the same product.

How do you approach risk-taking in this environment?

For the most part we still take risks. We have to, that is our business, always on the cutting edge of fashion. We just don’t order the same numbers that we have been ordering in the past. That keeps us special.

With many people stressing that through hard-times emerges new creativity and opportunity, how true is this?

Extremely true. These times force people to rely on their creativity and not their bank account.

For small start-up brands, do you have any suggestions given both saturation and economic factors breathing down their neck?

For the most part, a lot of brands that are struggling now, came into this game when times were a little easier than usual. We are now getting back to normal. Nothing is easy. Do what you feel in your heart and play it out to the fullest. Some will be successful, and some not but at least you know, win or lose…your ideas are being properly represented. Make sure all facets of your business make sense (distribution, production and marketing). A lot of guys are making a product and marketing it to the wrong guy or selling at the wrong store. This might work for the short terms but in the long run it confuses the customer.

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Hikmet Sugoer – Solebox

What is your current strategy to keep busy and continue surviving given the current economic conditions?

We are living in hard times, but to be true, we started in hard times. So best is to be optimistic and fight for things you believe in. It is now a part of my life. So I do not want to miss it. Under no circumstances.

How have sales worked out for you, how important and necessary of a retail tool is it? What sort of effect will these massive sales throughout retail affect the consumer when things pick-up again?

Sales were pretty stable. We have the big luck to be one of the first in our country with what we are doing. Sure, the cake did not grow over the time like companies thought, but we done our best to serve a bigger part of the cake.

Have you been more keen on certain types of advertisement or more willing to open up if you traditionally didn’t advertise?

I know you guys live from advertising. And we are all in one system. We have to work close together. But one point is fact: times are changing. Websites like yours changed the view of fashion. You are the newspaper of the people out there in this material. We love to create news instead buying news. But we love to support in other ways, the system.

What sort of lasting effect will the current situation have on your business/direction down the road?

We are sure, that what we are doing is a stable way of business.

What sort of positives can you draw from this economic downturn if anything?

The market gets cleaned. It is like a reset button on a computer. You start again or not.

In the current economic landscape, what sort of styles do you feel are an easier sell, has buying become a little more commercial?

Sure, people buy over the price. But we are happy to be not so much depending on mass products. So we can still be true to our concept. It is like a fond. We have a good mixture.

How do you approach risk-taking in this environment?

We minimize risk. We do not buy in stuff where we think it will not work.

With many people stressing that through hard-times emerges new creativity and opportunity, how true is this?

I am sure under hard-times you are forced to find new ways. You have to be creative to survive. But if I had the option I would go for the Easy-Times.

[Smiles]

For small start-up brands, do you have any suggestions given both saturation and economic factors breathing down their neck?

Minimize cost at this time and try to survive at minimum. Wait for better times and come back in full effect. But do not quit if you trust in your work.

Although a relatively general question, what has had the biggest impact

on you from a business and personal perspective?

The Internet. It is a really good thing, but a really bad thing at once. We have the luck to communicate around the globe in seconds. But now local customers can buy all over the world. Compare prices. Benefit from exchange rates. Anonymous hating. And many other things are possible.

Any closing notes you’d like to finish off with?

Sure, when I have the possibility to talk, I do not wait:

Dear Companies:

Please rethink your philosophy of doing limited editions and specials. On the market are more limited editions then inline stuff. The inline products are more limited nowadays then the limited products. Your inline products are good enough to serve the market. Please rethink your distributions sometimes. Does it make sense to have your highest and limited products in the same city at 10 retailers in one area? No need to deliver every shop with the same. Try to work closer with your existing customers. Give them the feeling of loyalty. Your own shops are good too. But own shops can not build trends and demands like ours. And it gives the feeling of doing direct business without the existing shops. Together we can reach more.

Dear Shops:

If you just opened or just want to open. Please do not buy in stuff you can not sell. At the end you will do massive sales. This is not good for the whole market. You educate your customers to buy only at your sale days. Please rethink if you like to open something what the world do not needs now. Be creative and find other ways then others are doing. Check the local needs and build your business on this. I am sure you will love to be different and companies will thank you.

Dear Customers:

It is always understandable to buy things cheap. I do this too. But long time business can’t survive without margins. So if you like to do something good, try to support your local shops as much as possible. Even if you can get sometimes things somewhere cheaper online. But if it is only some bucks then please support your local dealer, it is like food for living for shops. Shops are loyal to customers even willing to give in-house discounts to frequent buyers.

I know this sounds like a socialistic market or too idealistic. But we have to work together. I do not want to hear someday that the big companies are closing down. All is possible nowadays. But not only negative things…we like to see the positive things. I am now going to buy me some new trainers!

Cheers, Hikmet.

Fiberops Website
FUCT Website
HAVEN Website
Qubic/Quarters Website
Solebox Website
Union Website

Date: Mar 23, 2009  /  Views: 12  /  Author: Staff
Category: Editorial  /  Tags: Erik brunetti, Interviews, Features, Hikmet sugoer, Alyasha moore, Chris gibbs, Arthur chmielewski, Frank liew